Shall we say at once that the flora of Weymouth is that of a New England coast town, and so smooth the way for the often quoted statement that every old resident of the town indorses: "And when I had considered more seriously of the beuty of the place with all her faire endowment, I did think in all the knowne world it could not be parall'd. For so many groves of planes, sweele crystall fountaines and cleare running streams that twine in fine meanders through the meadows."

Tree and flower and lichen are not less interesting because they grow also elsewhere. Their charm lies in their abundance and distribution and grouping.

The plant life of a place is closely connected with the geography and the geology of that place. A botanist includes in his marks of identification of a species the habitat. Because the surface and soil of Weymouth are so varied, the plant life is correspondingly various. Rocky ridge and swamp, plain and meadow, riverbank and seashore, barren pasture and fertile meadow have each its own forms of vegetation, changing with the changing season, reappearing each year in their season.

Had the surface been more uniform, more readily adaptable to any one form of exploitation, much of its early charm Would have been long ago cultivated away. As it is, one has to go but a short distance back from the homes that border the old roads to find much the same scenery that the early settlers found. Trees such as sheltered the first log cabins, frui"+ the same as those tuat eked out me settlers' scanty food supply, herbs like those from which simples were then brewed, all still abound.

The roads wind along avoiding the ledges on the one hand and the too wet footing near lake or river on the other. From the roadway one looks off to a horizon fringed with trees, usually oaks. S(inetimes, when the road climbs a hill, a wayside elm is seen overtopping the oaks; and again, when it dips into a valley, the nuarer pines are thrown into relief against the sky. Woodland has been cut over and wood fires have done their part in destroying [lie primitive forests. Level stretches had been cleared for farms and meadows. A few pastures have grown up to brush and a new gl(wth of trees has replaced what was destroyed, making it true now (as it was three hundred years ago) that the place is "very pivasant and healthful. . . . and is well timbered and hath good Morv of hay ground."

164 THE FLORA OF WEYMOUTH

Oaks predominate on the ledges, -red oak, white oak, scrub oak, chestnut oak, - and seedlings that it would be hard to identify. On the plains the pine that bears the same name as the town is abundant. There were giant pines in the earlier days, as old stumps still show. There are still several pine groves carefully tended and increasing in beauty with every year. There are scattered single trees that somehow escaped when others around them were cut, and, growing in the open, have developed into handsome specimens. There are new growths (chance sown or set out) that well keep up the succession.

Formerly wood-cutting was a regular winter task. Every wellequipped farm included a woodlot from which the year's supply of fuel came. The best of these lots furnished lumber, and the winter cut of pine furnished spring work for several mills.

The cut is smaller now in size and quantity, although hauling logs to the mill to be cut into box boards is still done each spring.

There are red maples bordering the meadows and white cedars in the swamps. There are red cedars in the upland p-~stures mingled with white birch and pitch pine. There are elms along the main highways. Norway and white maples and ash trees shade the newer streets. Some of the old trees have been cut away in the interest of safe travel. Shorter-lived trees have been set where a growing population has resulted in the breaking up of large land holdings into smaller properties. Still, one can judge approximately the age of a street by its overhanging foliage.

There are hillsides grown up to beech. There are willows along the river and by the lakes. There is at least one hemlock-covered hill. There are stray tupelos and numerous aspens and buttonwoods and hickories, yellow and gray birches and wild cherries and all the long list of native bushes and shrubs that make the New England woods so lovely.

Wherever homes have been long established, trees other than native are sure to be found, - Norway spruce and arbor vitae set to break the force of the north winds; apple and pear orchards; a tulip tree; a copper beech; a row of Lombardy poplars.

On the newer "house lots" trees are now left in the process of clearing, and new trees are set, doing away entirely with the "land boom" effect.

These trees shade home grounds individual in their treatment and harmonious in their expression of order and thrift and love of growing things. Tiny grass plots alternate with larger ones edged with barberry or privet hedges. Woodbine and honeysuckle shade porches. Grape vines, with main stems thick as the trunks of small trees, cover arbors; trumpet vines hold out big blossoms from old trees and fences, inviting all the humming birds in the neighborhood. Trim flower beds edge trim walks. Shrubs border the grounds and frame the houses; hollyhocks grow against the fences. Everywhere are signs that the people " love not only the love of




flowers and the sight of them and the growing of them and the picking of them and the arranging of them, but also inherit from Pather Adam a natural relish for tilling the ground from which they are taken and to which they shall return."

There are grounds that merit special mention: a lovely rose garden on Commercial Street, and another at North Weymouth; an informal garden shielded from wind and dust by tall shrubs which enclose a wide, tree-shaded lawn and form a background for a charming succession of blooming things new and old, - a garden always fragrant, always colorful and a source of delight to owner and to those who are fortunate enough to be among her many friends; a garden in which a rock ledge meets one side of the lawn and protects the early bulbs that creep up in its warm shadow; a garden in which a wistaria clothes the long front porch and drapes the house to the top of the second story windows; a lovely colonial garden around a colonial cottage where the walks are box-bordered and the green and white gateway sets one to imagining the beauties beyond it.

A garden now largely a memory was that tended by Abigail (Smith) Adams, whose name has been chosen for the new women's dormitory at M. A. C. as being that of the woman most closely associated with the early agriculture of Massachusetts.

There are many of these little gems of gardens scattered all over the town. There are many more beginning to be, and there are in places of older gardens, outlasting the homes of which they were once a part, clumps of lilac spreading and flourishing, inviting by their fragrance the childish pruning that renews thei~ youth; bouncing Bets along the roadside, descendants of the plants whose leaves were so useful to the early housewives in scouring the deal tables; cinnamon roses and clove pinks, spicy forerunners of more modern varieties.

There are "old-fashioned" flowers in many gardens, - lavender and honesty and mullein pink. There are several "old-fashioned gardens" in the making, and the pleasant neighborly custom of exchanging seeds and cuttings and roots of this and of that abides still with us.

Florists find the town a good one to locate in. One nursery is taxed to its full capacity. One dahlia and two gladiolu* specialists are here, and our peony specialist, the late George Hollis, known and honored by his neighbors for his charming personality, was known everywhere among growers of that flower for his skill as a grower and as an originator of new varieties.

In a town of permanent homes, the home vegetable garden Rourislies, large or small according to the amount of land and time available for it, but always a matter of pride and a source of much ~atisfaction.

There are a few larger gardens, business propositions for whose output there is a good market locally and in near-by cities and M11"Iner colonies.

166 THE FLORA OF WEYMOUTH

Land not so well adapted to farming is ideal for fruit growing. Smai[ orchards, largely apple orchards, are an established part of the homesteads. There is one seedling apple, the property of a Weymouth man, which has associated with its name "Penelope," a bit of local folklore. Larger orchards just coming into bearing are ready to take the places of some of the picturesque gnarled old patriarchs that still make apple-blossom time here a thing to be remembered. Small fruits, especially strawberries, are grown, replacing the wild ones whose hiding places are known to a favored few.

Interest culminates in the annual fair in September. That this fair has outlived all other fairs in the county tells its own story, and proves, if proof be needed, that our townspe~lple "sette great stoore by theyr gardiens."

The overflow of interest results it) the pretty parks and greens and squares in town; in the well-kept grounds of public buildings; and in the attractive school and church grounds.

The strips and plots of land lying between the home grounds and the woods or the water are rich in plant life. On the ledges lichen-, paint colorful impressionist pictures, and saxifrage and columbine and corydalis find foothold in the cracks and crowd the tough little polypody fronds. Near by are the upland pastures, home of the early everlasting and the sturdy little cinquefoil, later fragrant with bayberry and sweetfern. Here, too, grow the low goldenrod and the stiff-leaved aster, covering the fields in fall with cloth-of-gold embroidered in blue. If the underlying rock is near enough to the surface to make healthy pockets of soil here, these pastures are overgrown by berry bushes and known to pickers for miles around. Once "free for all" these berry pastures are now becoming valuable private property from which trespassers are warned by the rather gruesome sign, "Private Berrying Ground. Keep Out." Down in the swamps cat-tail rushes shelter a variety of orchids and orchid-like plants. Under the pines the lady's slipper blooms with Indian pipes and wintergreen. On welldrained woody hillsides the arbutus hides, and in sunny open spots hepatica grows.

The meadows are wonderful hunting grounds. Spite of care, the best ones are sprinkled with buttercups and daisies. The fresh meadows are genimed with marsh marigold in spring; then pale blue with violets and iris; yellow with loosestrife and seneca in summer, and bordered with joe-pye weed and thoroughwort in the fall. The salt marshes gleam red with samphire in autumn. Along the river cress and forget-me-not thrive and the lily-pond is white and fragrant in June, blue and white with pickerel weed and arrowhead in August, and framed in the lavender and old face of aster and wild carrot in September.

Along the shore, seaside golden rod lifts heavy plumes, and marsh rosemary creeps toward the beach. Off shore, seaweeds wave as the tides come and go.




The stone walls that still separate many of the pastures are overgrown and concealed by sumach and June berry and shadbush, and these in turn have been seized upon by climbing bittersweet and clematis and woodbine and wild smilax, to the joy of the birds who find a refuge there.

A little way out from the centers of the villages, the broad thoroughfares narrow to country roads.

Earliest spring finds the spicebush blossoming there, and late October is welcomed by the witch-hazel. In the interval have appeared successively anemones and ferns, early buttercups and white violets, star flower and blue-eyed grass and yarrow, wild rose and elderberry and black alder, - everything that the books list as common in New England, and some blooms not so common.

There is one locality where the yellow violet grows, and at least one place where the fringed gentian is found. There are several stretches blue with the wild iris, some specimens of which show color markings not yet recorded. There are long lines of cardinal flower by the river. The rare and lovely sabbatia, both the pink and the white variety, grows by the pond. One spot is known as "the place where the maiden-hair grows"; perhaps its hollow is where 'be fallen plaster of an old lioiue furnished the lime that made possible the germination of some wind-sown spores.

There is always color here, the white of meadow-rue and daisy, the green of fern, the purple of blossoming grasses, the yellow of dandelion. There is fragrance from blossoming maple and wild bean and clethra. There are sounds of wind in the beech and pine and poplar trees overhead, and of bees in the blossoms underfoot. There are things to nibble, many of them if one turns aside to follow footpatbs,-checkerberry leaves, and sassafras root and sweet cherry bark, elderberry and barberry, mint and sweet flag and hazel nuts.

There are pictures for an artist - of the river -







of the cottage roofs peeping out among pines on a hillside; of the church spires rising above the tree tops; of loaded hay wagons moving slowly toward home in the late afternoon.

One knowing the New England writers and knowing also the scenery in Weymouth could find here illustrative material for the choicest passages of our poets, for whole poems, - Holmes' "Spring Has Come;" Whittier's "April;" Margaret Deland's "Summer;" Celia Thaxter's "August;" Lowell's "Indian Summer;" Longfellow's "Autumn;" Lucy Larcom's "November;" for couplets or stanzas -

168 THE FLORA OF WEYMOUTH









Whole chapters from Bradford Torrey's books could have been written about Weymouth, as, indeed, many of them were: " Flowers and Folks;" "A November Chronicle;" "In Praise of Weymouth Pine;" "An Old Road" (known to all old residents); "My Real Estate" (a bit of land still taxed to his heirs).

One could quote from his writings endlessly, and to get the best descriptions of Weymouth bird and plant life one must read Bradford Torrey.

Two there are who sense the full beauty of a place, - he who sees it for the first time, as did Thomas Morton, and he who has grown up in intimate sympathy with it, as did Bradford Torrey.

just a New England coast town, but "in all the knowne world it could not be parall'd."






The history of the town of Weymouth covers a period of three hundred years, and is no less fruitful in important and stirring events than that of any of its contemporaries. The early voyagers were attracted to it by its beautiful and protected situation, shielded from the ocean by the beach and peninsula of Nantasket, and from the Indians by its position extending far into the bay, between the two rivers. Its central location made it also easy of access both bywaterand land from a large reachof territory, thust-endering it a favorable point for trade with the natives. Thc wandering fishermen and traders, who were ranging the New England coast during the early years of the seventeenth century, soon discovered its value and made it a point of rendezvous. From it they could easily slip out upon the ocean, and front it they could make such excursions upon the land as were necessary in accomplishing their purposes.

The great companies were then looking for the men and the places by whom and where they could carry out their grand schemes, accumulate the fortunes and seize the honors they foresaw already within their grasp; and, not more scrupulous than some of their modern successors, they were not always as careful as to the means by which their purposes were to be accomplished as might be desired. Land was here in abundance, and its rightful owners, if there were any, were few, ignorant and of no fixed abode. The geography of the coast was not well understood; and it easily happened that conflicts of jurisdiction arose between the various claimants that caused, in after times, no little vexation and trouble. If the various grants came in conflict, the boundaries were not well defined, and a fine position near the border, once in possession, might perhaps be held against future comers. It was a great distance from the courts that held jurisdiction, and influences might be brought to bear, even upon those high in authority, that would render the result of a trial anything but certain. justice was tardy, her eyes liable to partial blindness, and her hand held the scales in uncertain poise. Thus the position of things prepared the way for a train of events involving a great deal of disturbance and perplexity, and the result was usually in favor of those holding the most money and home influence.

Such was the condition of affairs during the first quarter of the seventeenth century. The Virginia Company, whose patent covered the southern portion of the English possessions in America, established at Jamestown, Va., in 1607, a colony which commenced

· long and severe struggle for existence. In 1614 the Dutch began

· settlement on Manhattan Island, at the mouth of the Hudson, - an entering wedge between the two portions of the continent claimed

170 GENERAL HISTORY

by Frgland,-and seven years later, at the close of the year 1620, the Plymouth Company, after much discussion and bargaining, invited the Pilgrims (then temporarily living in Leyden, Holland), to embark for the coast of New England, and the colony located it Plymouth, where the resolute members of that community commenced their hand-to-hand conflict with the terrible circurnstances against them, and which proved almost too great for their strength.


Weymouth is the most ancient town in Norfolk County, and, next to Plymouth, in the Commonwealth, and its original boundaries have been preserved without material change until the present time; therefore its lines are the same for any date in its history of two hundred and sixty years. The town borders upon the shore of Boston Harbor, with its center about thirteen miles southeasterly from Boston, and about double that distance northwesterly from Plymouth.

It is above nine miles in extreme length from the Abington line on the south, to the shore of the bay on the north, with an average of about seven miles. It lies between Braintree and Holbrook on the west, and Hingham on the east, with a width, nearly uniform, of about two and a half miles. It has a water front on Fore and Back Rivers of eight or nine miles, and its whole area contains between sixteen and seventeen square miles. Of this area a considerable portion is covered by ponds. Great Pond, in the southerly pait, is about a mile and one-third in length, and one-third of a mile in width, with a surface of about two hundred and fifty acres. Whitman's Pond, centrally located, is about one-third less in extent than Great Pond, being nearly as long, but of very irregular form. Whortleberry Pond, a little south of Whitman's, is small, nearly circular, and about forty rods in diameter. There are but two streams of any importance, - "Mill River," the outlet to Great Pond, running into Back River a distance by its course, in which it passes through Whitman's Pond, of five or six miles, and "Old Swamp River," rising in Hingham and flowing into Whitman's Pond, about two and one-half or three miles in length. These rivers have several very fine water privileges, one of which, that of the East Weymouth Iron Company, has been thought one of the best in the State. There are but two hills of noticeable prominence in the town, - Great Hill, on the shore of the bay, and King Oak Hill, about two miles farther south.' From the summits of both are to be seen some of the finest views in the State.


These tw,, hillsow, o,grl.,tv formed accurate, easily let,,nd,d. and have bre. for. file be.
,un, ng of E1191111L "I l ofulltilla favorite Wcat ions, and have been under cult vation to theirsumarts
during the whole ,,i~,d since that ti.e. Great Hill, early known as Smith's Hill. slituated nor file
verge of the biy in tla~ extreme north, wo. . hualreark to fit, early .yogci. smat Massachusetts
rla,, and lh,s no,, sc,,,,d the same useful purpose to the,, There was formerly a road
1,lidiin, to its sommit. Kill, Ork Hill has art so short, an elevation, is stunted Either Word,
and was ellideuti, and by it,, constants as .idea aus, an it was divided lot. .,.all has. It
overlwks file country for a long distanec inland, while on the eatt file view is It ... d'd only by
I he o".u"



There are two inlets making in from the bay, navigable for vessels of considerable size, - Fore River on the north and west, four or five miles in length, and Back River on the northeast, three or four miles long. The extreme northeasterly portion of the town is a long and narrow neck of land extending into the bay for a mile and a half or more, while beyond this, to the north, about eighty rods away, lies Grape Island, separated only by the narrow mouth of Back River, and is of an oblong shape, about half a mile in length -rd. sixty rods in width, while about two hundred rods farther to [Ite north, in the bay, lies another small island, called Sheep Island.' Both of these belong to Weymouth, are wholly destitute of trees, and used only for pasturage.

Almost the whole of the south part of the town is an elevated plateau, with a light sandy or gravelly soil, capable, with good tillage, of producing fair crops. The surface from this plain commences to fall away with gentle undulations until it reaches the sea. The northern portion has always enjoyed the reputation of containing the best land for cultivation, while only a comparatively small portion of the whole area is unfit for agricultural purposes in consequence of swamp, ledge or barrenness. Formerly farming was the principal industry, and the larger portion of the population gained their livelihood from the produce of the soil; but during the present century manufactures have increased to such an extent as almost to exterminate the former. On Fore and Back Rivers'a large amount of business is done in lumber and coal, while the Old Colony and South Shore railroads bring in great quantities of grain, flour and other necessaries.

For the first hundred years the town constituted one precinct, but in 1723 it was divided into two, the south being somewhat the larger. Quite recently, for practical and convenient purposes, it has been dividixi into five wards, - two at the south, one at the east, one at the Landing, and one at the north. Until 1793, Weymouth constituted a part of Suffolk County, but in that year Norfolk County was established and Weymouth made a part of it. It has four post offices, one in each of the principal villages, with telegraphic and telephonic accommodations along the lines of the Old Colony and South Shore Railroads, which cross the town at different points.





In 1635 the place came into general notice and took a prominent position among the towns composing the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Off the 8th of July of that year the General Court passed an order permitting Rev. Joseph Hull, with twenty-one families,


Tho following from the town record was renied from the General Court records: "A General
Clonc " at Boston iho All do, of fifth rarn. Ar. 1636.
- Illonal World and Graire Island are granted to the Towne of Wvymm,th."
172 GE'NERAL HISTORY

consisting of about one hundred persons, to settle at Wessaguscus, the largest additioH at any one time probably in the history of the town. These settlers came from Weyrrn,rit:., Eng., and belonged to the (ounly of Dorset and its immediate neigli6orhood.

They were a class of people who soon became prominent, and whose families, many of them, retain their position at the present day. Theii minister, Rev. Joseph Hull, became for a time the minister of the town. On the 2d of September the town was erected into a plantation, equivalent, probably, to an act of incorporation, and tire name changed to Weymouth, which it has since retained. I On the following day it was ordered to send a deputy to the General Court, to which office William Reade, John Bursley and John Upham were elected, these three being sent as an accommodation to three strong, opposing elements their existing in the town, consisting, probably, of those who remained of the Gorges Company and friends who followed them, those who came in from other towns in the colony with an interest centering in the capital, and a third, embracing those who came with Rev. Joseph Hull and their sympathizers. John Bursley represented the first, William Reade the second, and John Upham the third. The court influence predominating, Mr. Reade was retained and the others were permitted to retire. During the years 1635 and 1636, commissioners were appointed to establish the bounds between Mount Wollaston and Weymouth, of which Fore River and the Smelt Brook formed a part, thence by a straight line running south a little westerly, until it reached the line of Plymouth Colony; also between Weymouth and Bare Cove, afterwards Hingham, of which line Back River and a creek called Fresh River formed a part, thence on a line nearly parallel with the western boundary to the Plymouth Colony line. These bounds, which were the more ancient ones reestablished, have remained to the present time Willi little if any change. I

Ferries had already been erected, connecting the town with its neighbors on either hand, and bridges were projected for the better accommodation of traffic and travel. Roads were built toward Boston, and mills erected upon the streams. A quarterly court was established, to be held in Boston, to which Roxbury, Dorchester, Weymouth and Hingham belonged; and for the better protection of the various towns in the colony from the Indians, it was ordered by the General Court that no dwelling house should be built more than half a mile from the meeting-house. I It appears, however, that the latter order was never enforced, or soon became a dead letter, for at this time the people of Weymouth were scattered over a territory from two to three miles in extent. The larger- part of the population lived in North Weymouth, commonly known as "Old Spain," extending from the shore of the bay to Burying Hill, more than a mile, while there were quite a number of plantations






extending south and east over King Oak Hill as far as Fresh Pond, now Whituran's, in East Weymouth.

Where the first meeting-house was built is unknown, but tradition says in Old Spain, probably near what is now the center of the village; but this did not long remain, giving place to a more commodious building which stood upon Burying Hill, near where North Street now passes through it. This remained until 1682, when a third was erected upon the spot now occupied by the meeting house of the First Parish. The houses of the inhabitants were mostly rude structures built of logs, and thatched with the coarse grass found at the head of the beaches above the salt water, which was carefully preserved for the purpose by order of the town. I In 1642, April 26, tire Indian title to the town was extinguished by purchase. The original deed is not to be found, but a copy stands upon the records of the Suffolk County registry of deeds, and is a curious specimen of the sharp trading which the early fathers allowed themselves to indulge in when dealing with the native owners. It was signed by Wampetuck, alias Josias Webecowett, Nateaunt and Nahowton, sachems.



The following copy of the original deed of the territory of Weymouth given by the Indians is coiiied literally from the town records, and differd in many details, although the same in essential matters, with that entered upon the Suffolk Record of Deeds. This Seems to be the older record, while that in Boston was entered in 1685:


AN AGREEMT BETWERNE YE INHABITANTS OFF WAMOUTH CONCERNING THERE
LAND SOLD NOW To yE TOWNE OFF WAMOUTH
THIS PICESENTE YEARE 1642 ys 26TH OFF YE 2D MO.

Know all men by theese presents yt whereas we Wampetuc alias Josias Webcowett Nateaunte and Nahauton did formerly possess and retaine ye Land of Wessagussett now cald Wamouth we whose names are above written Winne are now ye Pip, owners of ye afaresd Land of ye Towne now mid Wamouth viz: V~ampetuc alias Josias Webcowett Nateaunte and Nahauton As we had it given to us frS our predecessors viz: a greate Sagamore caid Wampetue We doe hereby declare and publish to all men yt ffor & in consideration yt we ye aforesd persons have reed from y~ English men whoe are now planted In & about yt place of Wessagusset (now cald Wamouth) Sixe Acors off ground enipayld & broken up and one house as also fowre and Twentye Acors of ground lying neare ye small pond Beare ye plantation or Towne now cald Wainouth. In Consideration whereoff we y~ aforesd p'sons have and doe ffully give and graunte assigne sett over and absolutely yeald up at! yt aforesd ground before spoken off and all yt estate right title interest possessione benefitt claime and dernaund yt we ye aforesd p'tyes or any off us had may might or ougit to have in or to ye sd premises or any p'te or p'cel thereoff: And this is our oil interest yt ye aforesd p'sons shall hould to i7 and theres fforever all yt ground

Anil hereby we due If Oily and freely declare yt we are ff oily satisfied ffor our former Interest And doe now account y,, English now living there in yt Towne



174 GENERAL HISTORY

off Waniouth ye true and p'p owners, of ye Bounds off yere Towne according to yere 1,junt.9 ordered by ye Gencrall Courte And hereby we doe publish to all yt we bind our selves and ours forever to ruainteine this our dede and sale to ye presence inhabitants of waniouth foierly cald wessagusset and to yeM posteritie ffor ev,r: And for as much as now ye Aforesd ground is now become ye true propictic off ye presente inhabitants off ye aforesd place to ~ and yeTes forever we ye aforesd p'sons above specified doe account our selves now inhabitants off 3e Towne & yere fore to enjoy all privilidges with 7 & one other than 37 selves enjoy an(] doe p'miss yt We will live orderly among 57 iff yey receive any claage through our abode with 7 either by our dogs traps or otherwise we will ffully rec6pence ye daniage as ye English in ye Towne yt are Towne dwellers doe III witness %%he,e(,ff wee have sett our hands


JAMES PARKER
WILL: JEFFERAY
WILLIM CARPENTER
JOHN UPPAME
THOMAS WHITE

In presence of us
EDWARD BENNETT
JAMES LUDDON
~ mark Of T H
Ttjo~ fim.imooxE

The S marke off WAMPETUC & ye The ZZ crarke off WERPOWETT The n marke off NATEAUNTE The V marke off NAHAUTON


The following is entered on the margin of the deed:

Dated 3 1 1652

An agreenit made With Natahant in ye behalfe of ye Indians that have right to 24 acors of planting land which land they were to have by ye ffresh Pond neere the Towne which land ye sit Natahant is content to take for hiniselfe and the Rest of the Indians that have right to this land aboue Smilt Brooke to which agreenct I ye abone scl Natahant have set my hand

The -s marke off Nataliant in ye presence off us Townsmen





('apt John Holbrook aged about 66 years testify & Edith that he was present and did see Natahant an Indian signe & acknowledge this writing abome to be his Act & Deed & that he this deponent itch the other witnesses (Selectmen of the Towne of Weymoth) sett their hands as witnesses.

Sworric in Boston July 90,, 1685.

                          Before its, JOHN RICHARDS: ELISIIA COOKE.


The 7th clay of July, 1685 James Ludden Senior of Wayniotb in New England aged: 74 yeares; whose Name is Subscribed as the onely Surviving wi . Loves to this Deed of Sale made by the Indians of ye Towne of Waymoth as on the other side doth fully appeare; lie the mid James Ludden p'rsonally speared before me tinder w,itt and on his Corporall collie deposed ]'list he saw the mid Indians .ho we, c ye Grantors of ye Land herein mentioned signe & Deliver this Deed of Sale to ye use of the Inhabitants of mid Towne of waymoth and theire posteritic fforever: And that lie was present when James Parker and the Rest of the witnesses Subsc. ibed their Names hereunto;


            GENERAL IIISTOR), . 175


Taken upon oath the Day & yeare about, written before me William Torrey appointed to Administer Dailies by the Genii Court.

Lib: 13th page 349 & a

Entered with the Records of the County of Suffolke for Deeds. 10th July: 1685

                    Atteste I.- ADDINGTON, Clke.


III December, 1636, the General Court ceded to Weymouth, Grape Island and Round Island, the only additions ever made to its territory. ' During the eight years from the arrival of Rev. Joseph HIM, in 1635, to the departure of Rev. Samuel Newman, in 1643, Weymouth had gained largely in population and had become one of the most important towns in the colony. The records of the latter year, previous to the departure of Rev. Mr. Newman to Rehoboth with a large colony, estimated by some as high as forty families, contained the names of more than one hundred and thirty landowners, representing, most of them, heads of families. These records are imperfect, and probably do not represent by many the whole number. It isat this time that the regular records of the town commence, from which date they are comparatively good, probably as full as the average of the town records of the colony. Earlier than this the peculiar circumstances sur rounding the settlement conspired to envelop the history in much obscurity. The natural jealousy of the Pilgrims against the adherents of the Established Church, from which they had suffered so much, prevented them from making any fuller record than was absolutely necessary of their neighbors at Wessaguscus; and later, the Puritans at Boston were in the same condition and no better disposed, although on their own territory and under their own jurisdiction; while still later the disturbances produced by the conflicting elements in its own midst prevented the preservation of records that would be of inestimable value at the present time.


              NEW COUNTY

About 1725 the subject of forming a new county, to be set off from Suffolk, was agitated, but the project was steadily opposed by Weymouth, unless the court house should be located within five or six miles of the center of the town, to which the other towns would not consent.

              NORFOLK COUNTY

After the war the question of a new county was frequently raised and various action taken, sometimes favorable and sometimes opposed, but the matter was finally determined by the General Court, and the towns of Suffolk County southerly from Boston were set off and formed into Norfolk County in 1793. This, however, does

Hot seem to have suited the good people of Weymouth, for on

        Nta~achUsetts, Gelleral Court Records; Weymouth Town Records.

176 GENERAL HISTORY

August 26 of that year a committee was appointed to draw up a petition to the General Court, praying to be set off from Norfolk County and to be reannexed to Suffolk, but the movement was onSuccessful, and Weymouth has remained to the present time a part of Norfolk County, although the attempt was afterwards renewed, the reason alleged being that the shire town was too far awav.


              TOWN UNEs

In the beginning of the third volume of the town general records there is a full description of the town lines, as measured by James Humphrey, Esq., in 1794, probably the most correct and reliable of any to be found upon any record. On Aug. 21, 1820, a committee was appointed to oppose the petition of the Hingham and Quincy turnpike to the General Court to have the allowance paid to vessels passing through their drawbridges removed.

The following is a copy of the township lines taken from the record of James Humphrey, Esq., from measurements made by him in 1794:


Line between Hingham & Weymouth, Beginning oil the line at the south corner of Weymouth.

1. N. 13, E. 188 Rods. Spruce Tree W. 11.
2. N. 14, E. 132 Rods. Road by Smith's.
NOTE- - After nuining 32 Rotis North, 14 East, marLed a spruce W. H.; also marked another
spruce.
3. North I ly, E. 80 Rods~
4. 11 14, E. 26 Rods. Meeting hmise N. 81 W.
5. North 14~4, E. 100 Rods.
6. 13%, E. 988 " Road beyond Binney's.

7. 13y, E. 17 " then turning and following a river called Fresh River to the sea. Distance 4 miles 251 rods from Abington (on the line) to Fresh River.

Line between Weymouth & Abington, Beginning at the south corner of Weymouth.

S. 74, W. 46 rods to the road.
S. 72, W. 110 " S. 75, W. 20 rods, S. 69y, W. 49 rods.
S. 68, W. 70 " S. 66, W. 20 " S. 70, W. 45 "
S. 70, W. 72 " S. 77K, W. 14 " S. 69, W. 320 "
S. 77, W. 36 " S. 72, W. 18 " S. 69, W. 180 "
Abington Line 1000 rods (3 miles & 40 rods).

Line between Weymouth & Braintree & Randolph, Beginning at the Smelt Brook near the Bridge.

Course S. 14, W_ to the southwest corner of Weymouth.

        Line against Braintree 3 miles 182 roals. Randolph 2 " 118


            5 300


              NEW PRECINCT


In 1722 an important matter came up which threatened to seriously disturb the friendly relations that the two sections of the town held toward each other. With the increase of population, the settled portions of the town gradually extended until they


            GFNFRAL HISTORY 177


cmered more or less densely its entire territory, verging in the north and south toward villages. The length of the town and its narrowne~s contributed to form it into distinct sections, with separate interests and associations, and this naturally engendered it feeling of conflict, if not of hostility, when any questions came up oil which there could be a territorial difference of opinion.

These opportunities often occurred, particularly in school and paribli affairs. The former could more easily be adjusted, as schools could be supplied at moderate expense for all portions; but with it-gard to church and parish, the matter was more difficult to manage, since the church was already established, with its meeting house located in the north part of the town, and a second church will) its necessary expense would involve a burden too heavy for the abilities of the town to sustain. Yet the distance, some five or more miles for a large portion of the inhabitants, and the constantly occurring occasions of disagreement, finally brought the matter to a crisis, the south portion of the town coming to the determination to have its own church and meeting-house, either by a new precinct or by a new town.

Accordingly, a petition signed by about forty of the inhabitants of the south part of the town was presented to the General Court, setting forth the difficulties of their position, and praying to be set off as a distinct town or precinct. The north part being in the majority, and disliking to be disturbed in its old-time arrangement, determined to oppose the movement and prevent, if possible, its consummation. A town meeting was called and a committee chosen to oppose the petition to the General Court. Attempts were made to accommodate the difficulty by a proposed removal of the meetinghouse to a more central locality, all of which failed. Notwithstanding the efforts of the town, as represented by its majority, the Gencral Court, in the spring of 1723, recognizing the reasonableness of the request, granted it, and the South Precinct was organized with a territory covering more than half of the area of the town. But this (lid not heal the breach, as subsequent events proved, for there were yet continual sources of trouble and difficulty arising from the parsonage property which was in possession of the North Precinct, and which its people refused to relinquish.


          ATTEMPT TO DIVIDE THE TOWN

In 1796 the division of the town was again proposed, this time by the North Precinct, and a petition presented to the General Court for that purpose. The feeling ran very high, the North Precinct being almost unanimously in favor, and the South as decidedly opposed. For the next half a dozen years the matter was in constant agitation in public and in private, in parish meeting and in town meeting, and the town was so nearly divided upon the subject that the votes were sometimes in favor and sometimes against. At that time, about the year 1802, according to a canvass

178 (;E,LVAI_ HISTORY

made for the purpose, the population was found to have increased 1" 1,803, 965 of whom lived in the North Parish and 838 in the S(Iltll; tile ratable polls in the North were 211, and in the South, 201 ; tNNo-fifths of the land was in the North, and three-fifths in .the South; of the money at interest, the South had $22,9~0, ~nd the North had $20,133. The Senate voted in favor of a division, bill the House refused, and the matter was referred to the next Session, March 3, 1803, which was equivalent to air indefinite postponenient of (lie whole subject. Thus the question has remained to the present, With spasmodic attempts from time to time to revive it, but neNer with much prospect of success.


        FINAL ATTEMPT TO DIVIDE THE TOWN

Several attempts were made to revive the question of a division of the town, and March 19, 1866, a vote was actually passed to do this (269 to 239) upon the northerly line of the fifth and sixth school districts, and a committee of one appointed from each district to carry the vote into effect; but the matter appears to have been dropped, to be again called up March 4, 1878, when the selectmen and three from each ward, twenty in all, were constituted a committee to take the whole matter into consideration and report. This report was made at the next annual meeting, held March 3, 1879, and was unanimous that it was inexpedient to divide the town at that time, and the report was accepted.'


      TuE Two HUNDRED ANu FIFTIETki ANNIVrRSARY

At the annual meeting held March 2, 1874, a committee was chosen to make arrangements to celebrate the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the settlement of the town, and the same committee wits also authorized to engage some one to prepare and publish a history of the town. The first vote was carried into effect on the 4th of July of that year by a public meeting upon King Oak Hill, with appropriate services, among which was an historical address by Charles Francis Adams, Jr., Esq., whose great-grandmother, Abigail Smith, wife of John Adams, second President of the United States, inferior to none of tire honorable women mentioned in the national history, was born and reared


Wii,ninuflo.roo,"Landiii
as it is called, a( (be head (if tidewater on Fore River Sent], Weymouth, East Weymouth, and
North Weyroonth, "I "Old Spain," a rame by which it has gonefrom time immemorial,and whose
origin ciono., new he t need, besides several smaller villages, as Lovell's Corner, bet.se. East
and South W,M.ti .,,it tb, Old North. ,norl between tire Landing, East Wcyue,uth grod
Old Spain. The larger villages are upon most points separated from each other by wide tracts
,if unsettled oraitem und see governed I 1, by local iudoeiit~ and finflin,turc Ifience there
has been from the first a great deal of friction in the management of the town's business, amounting
Ciftoit1.111a.luctilprialliel. This has been conspicuously on, case in the parish aud sellool matter,,,
and t lie result has been the various attempt s to divide t In, t.ovin TIii.,anroflmrmony,,orw,u,
it of its local doost it. has also unpars,ill hirgely the infleepic, if if,, t.a,,, whi,b, from its over
lation, weahli and busuress, should be on, if tire most important in the State. These remarks
.irs intended to (splain much of the action that appears upon tire recro'- , i : would otherwise
he difficult lo understand.

            GENERAL HISTORY 179


V, idlin a short distance of the spot where the address was delivered. The occasion was one of great interest, being the second of the kind held in Massachusetts, and was celebrated with much enthusiasni by a large number of the citizens of this and other towns, Min were cordially invited to the entertainment-


              TOWN HALL

In 1852, in view of the want of a proper place for holding town meetings, arid for quarters for town offices, the town hall was built on the westerly side of Washington Street, at the corner of Middle Street, and very near the geographical center of the town; a plain, inexpensive structure, but which has answered the actual necessities of the town in that respect for over thirty years.


            BUSINESS ENTERPRISES

With the increase of population and wealth there came also a revival of business enterprises, and soon after the beginning of the nineteenth century a new era of prosperity dawned upon the town, commencing at Weymouth Landing, at the head of tidewater on Fore River, and gradually extending over other parts of the town. In 1805 a turnpike was built through Weymouth, opening a more direct communication between Boston and Plymouth, by which the village at the Landing was largely the gainer. Under the lead of Capt. Samuel Arnold, Levi Bates and others, various branches

mechanical industry were started, and a new life infused into the community. Within a few years a large number of buildings were erected within a radius of half a mile. Navigation was resumed, and quite a brisk trade carried on between the town and Boston by means of sailing packets, which ran regularly; and it was in these days that shoe manufacturing commenced, which has since grown into such vast proportions.

In 1800, March 10, there is found for the first time upon the records the warrant for the town meeting entered in full, a custom that has been continued ever since; and under date of May 11, 1801, are found the qualifications of voters at that time, who were to be twenty-one years of age, and to possess a freehold valued at E60, or one yielding an income of X3 (free suffrage had not yet become the law of the land).

The town, which was always conservative, did not look altogether with favor upon the new enterprises, but viewed with jealous eyes the proposition to open new roads through its borders and construct bridges across the rivers, and went so far (Feb. 3, 1803) as to choose a committee to oppose them before the committee of the General Court, which had the matter under consideration, - such men as Cotton Tufts, Eliphalet Lend and Major John White being foremost in the opposition, - but the roads and the bridges were built, and the town was the better for them.

IKO GENERAL HISTORY

              POST 01,FICV


In 1804, Ft,bitia, y 0, t lie town instructed I lie selectmen to petition the Poslinaster-Gencral to establish a post office at or near the licad of na\igation at Fore River. This village, although the ~ouuge.,t in trovii, was already the most important. The answer to this petition was the establishment of the first post office ill XNey1rcuth. In 1809 the new work house at the Landing was complewd, costing about $1,600, and was used for the accommodation of file town's poor until the purchase of the present town farm, in 1839.


            GROWTH OF TUE TOWN


It may be of interest to note the gradual growth of the town expenses from the beginning, when almost every separate item was voted upon in open town meeting and there were almost no general appropriat ions, until the present time, when the annual expenditure of the town is not far from $100,000. Oil May 23, 1751, is noted the first general appropriation for the poor, amounting to E20. The highways were provided for by personal labor, arid it was not until after the year 1800 that anything like regular, stated appropriations were made. Beginning with tire year 1820, the average sums appropriated for expenses, other than schools and highways, were for the ten years from 1820 to 1830, about $1,400; for the succeeding decade, front 1830 to 1840, about $2,000; from 1840 to 1850, about $4,000, an increase of 100 per cent; from 1850 to 1860, about $7,000; from 1860 to 1870, about $15,000; and from 1870 to 1880, about $25,000, an increase in half a century of nearly 1,800 per cent, while the increase of population was but little more than 400 per cent.

The expenditure for schools, aside from tire buildings, beginning at about $100, had risen in the year 1800 to about $500, From 1800 to 1810, the yearly average was about $700; from 1810 to 1820, about $1,000; from 1820 to 1830, about $1,000 to $1,200 (in 1821 there were 895 children of school age); from 1830 to 1840, from $1,200 to $2,000; from 1840 to 1850, from $2,500 to $3,500 (in 1842 there were 1,099 children of school age); from 1850 to 1860, from $3,500 to $7,000; from 1860 to 1870, from $8,500 to S15,000; front 1870 to 1880, front $20,000 to $26,000, all increase since 1821 of 2,500 per cent, while the number of school children had increased but about 125 per cent (the census of 1880 showing 2,028 children of school age).

The increase of population for the first century and a half was very sinall indeed, the estimate for 1643 being about 1,000. The next estimate is from the Egerton manuscript in the British Museum, arid dates about 1675, in which the number of houses set down for Weymouth, in round numbers, is 250; allowing 5 to a house, this.

would give a population of 1,250. In 1750 the estimate was 1,200,

            GENERAL HISTORY 114!


A census in 1765 showed 1,258, while that of 1776 indicated 1,471, and in 1790 this had declined to 1,469. In 1800 quite a gain was shown in a total of 1,803. The following ten years there was an increase of but 86, while in 1820 the number had increased to 2,407. From this time the gain was rapid, the census of 1830 giving a Population of 2,837, while that of 1840 was 3,738, and that of 1850 stood at S,369. The succeeding ten years showed an increase of over 40 per cent, giving a total of 7,742. In 1870 the population was 9,010, and in 1880, 10,570, a gain in the present century of almost 500 per cent.

The appraised value of the real property was, in 1853, $1,138,999; and of the personal, $619,483, a total of $1,758,482. In 187S the real estate was valued at $3,863,523; and the personal, $2,107,711, a total of $5,971,234. This was the last State valuation.

These statistics show, in a comparative degree, the wonderful development of the town in material resources, and also its rapid progress in mechanical pursuits, while tire indications are not wanting that promise a long continuance of its prosperity.


            TOWN GOVLRNmrNT

Like that of nearly all of the early settlements, the government of the town was of a very simple pattern. Town meetings were called as necessity demanded, at irregular intervals; and townsmen, afterwards known as Selectmen, chosen at times and in number most convenient. The officers seem to have been their own recorders, since no regular clerk appears for twenty or thirty years. Meetings were notified upon training or lecture days by public call, and such business was transacted as tire time demanded.'

Unlike Plymouth arid Boston, Weymouth never really had a local Governor.

Capt. Robert Gorges came with authority to be Governor, but gave it Lip in a very few months, and he had no successor.

The settlement practically had the entire management of its own affairs from the start.

The first civil officers appear to have been the so-called "townsmen," - the original Selectmen.

I feel that it can be fairly maintained that American democracy had its first development in Weymouth. Plymouth was settled first and the Pilgrims gave us the basis of American government in the Mayflower Compact; but it was the second town, Weymouth, (flat instituted "government of the people, by the people, for the people."

Ilinghana oil one side and Braintree oil the other quickly followed

The o,,~cads of On, low. .111iti, held rnw. 26, 1651~ ,ontain, qait, in drisil, the I
io winch t1n, town adpt,d nadf e, its changed circonnstances. and adopted h, laws an'] re,,da-

nor, for nt~ w,ninnent which roved safficient for its wants for no)re than a lnlndr~ and fifiv 'Ial~. Urnif this time th", w", only a.6 dwer. Iccted and sod, lnasia~ transacted as tire loOlar,o.sles 't the o'cnsar, drntlodedi no clerk or assrssors apprar bo~re tln~ orn, now orese oflil,'~ Is"', r,logrd~,d a, . art of t1n, town c,,ra.,,a, and ibl local b"einess of tire town as-

~ooan:d , sod cst.blWnud far..
182 (;FNERAI. ms'roizy

her c\araple, and the resulting form of pure democracy, common1v called "WNNrl government," has spread all over the United States.

NN'liv not raise as our slogan: "Weymouth the first town with an Ametican goNernment," and 5hout it from Maine to California?

X\ hen and how the first land grants were made is not Known, but probabiv upon the earliest settlement the lands were divided as the nev(1s of tire settlers appeared; that remaining was held in common. A large portion of the north part of tire town was occupied, and it., early as 1636 there is record of a division of great lots at tire loiNci end of Fresh (Whitman's) Pond, some two or three miles from the shore of the bay.

[it 1643 a paroal record of the then property owners was made which has been preserved. Most of the early records are filled with regulations respecting cattle, cutting of timb-r. and such public matters as seem to be called for. The earliest officers, after townsmen, named upon the records, are fence viewers, and the number and prominence of the men appointed to this position Show it to have been at least no sinecure. There was the strictest scrutiny into the character and purpose of those who came among them. As early as 1646 a vote was passed forbidding any inhabitant from taking its an inmate any stranger without giving the town an indemnity bond against damage, under a penalty of a fine of 5 shillings per week; nor could he sell or let to any such person house or land, without having first tendered the same to the town at a training, lecture, or other public meeting.

During those early days frequent regulations were made for the preservation of pine and cedar, indicating a waste of that material. In 1648 Widow Hillard was required to give the town Security against harto from the charges of her children. At the first settlement, the town set apart the shore land between high and low water mar" for thatching purposes, thatch being at that time the most important material for roofing purposes, and there appeared to be a necessity to provide for its preservation; and when the General Court afterwards ordered that all lands to low-water mark should belong to the proprietors of the adjoining land, this regulation of the town was respected, and art exception made in its favor.

The highways were a matter of prime importance at an eariv date, and as far back as 1649 the inhabitants were required to work them at the call of the "way warden," under penalty. In 1650-51, March 1, a vote wits passed requiring the officers to post notices of the assessment of rates, and all persons liable to taxation were required to bring in lists of polls and property under penalty. March 10, 1651, 1 lie town voted to fine all such as should be tardy at town meetings 0 pence for each hour the meeting continued. The rates were to be laid so that the town bills could be promptly paid. particularly Captain Perkins' 10 pounds for six months' schooling, which is the first noticeupon therecord in relation to school matters.

About this time the town business had accumulated to such a

            GENI,RAI. HIS'I(RY 183


degree that it becarne necessary to adopt more Systematic measures in relation to its conduct.

Regular meetings were to be held on the first Monday in March
and the last Monday of November, for the choice of officers and
general business, while unimportant matters could be regulated
on lecture days without notice; and all military affair,, were to be
decided upon training days. The townsmen were also required to
make report of the action taken at their meetings. The first annual
town meeting was held Nov. 26, 1651, for the choice of town officers,
and the townsmen are now for the first time called "selectmen,"
a title which they have since retained. The powers of these officers
are given upon the record with minute detail, and the business of
the town seems to have been settled upo~ ;n rwarly the sa~-nc form
it bears at present.

The necessity of a town clerk was apparent, and Dea. John Rogers was chosen "recorder," his special duty being that of clerk to the selectmen. At this time there is a record made of those entitled to the great lots near Whitmam'~ Pond, numbering about sixty persons. Jan. 24, 1652-53, two thousand acres were set apart as town commons, running across the town from Braintree to Hingham, and near the center from north to south; at the same time Thomas Dyer was chosen to record births, deaths and marriakes, and William Torrey, recorder of deeds, etc. The town records seem at this time to have been in two divisions, each with its clerk, one for the personal and the other for the general record. In 1663 there is a record of the names, number of lot and acres, of each person who was allotted land in the first and second divisions, beginning on Braintree line,


              LAND DIVISIONS


The first division of lands in Weymouth was made in 1636 when every "complete" person wits to have six acres; under 12, three acres.

Edward Bennett had 18 acres; Henry Kingman, 42; Thomas White, 21; Robert Lovell, 34; Thomas Rawlins, 12; Richard Sylvester, 24; William Smith, 30; John Upham, 20; Rev. Joseph Hull, 54; Rev. Thomas Jenner, Sr., 19; Thomas jenner, Jr., 45; William Fry, 12; Edmund Hart, 18; Richard Adams, 24; Stephen French, 21.

Enoch Hunt (1651), Stephen French (1650), and Ephraim Hunt (1700) all had land in Weymouth near "Burying Island."

The following from the town records must have been compiled not earlier than Oct. 26, 1642, the date of tire death of William Fry, whose daughters are named among the property owners, and May 21, 1644, the date of the deed of Thomas Dyer to Thomas Bayley, conveying a grant of the property described a., belonging to him. There is reason to believe that the original record was joade by Rev. Samuel Newman:

184 GENERAL IUSTORV

            THE I-AND OF EDWARD BATE

I aker" of uppl.old in tile F~ast field first granted to --- others (,cold now in possession or Fd~ard Bate bounded oil the East with a lot of Robert 1~Llok)ll ... i the west N~itli a CcdaF ~wampe on the north with Jeffry Staples lot ,)it tire south ilh N,,thani,l Addanies his lot

Ifow,. Alorss firA granted to Will Solith HOW in the possession of Edward llatc b ... inde,l ).I tire E'ast & north by a swampe oil the West by a highway on I 11c SO in 11 b) I, r N,. nia,w~s lot

HN glit ikers upon the plaine three acres of it first giuen to John Upham 3
acre, to Ni, illiani ffrie two acres to John Whitirrarsh now in the possession of
F,Narll Bate bUUHd1d Oil the Last wh Nicholas Whites lout oil the West wh tire
oil tin, north N%h tire trayning gicene oil the South wh a swamp

flower acrrs of Sl,ainp 2 acres of it first giuen to Dar William Jeffereyes and 2 aCIrs to Richard Silue,te, I ... unded on the Fast with Richard Adanims his lot on tile Wr,t ~itlr his owne lot on tile North with ,it Newmans swumpe on the South %%ith the Warli ],,)use Hill

On a,r, of Salt marsh first giuen to William Richards now in the possession of F(Nard put, boundrd on Last with mr Gloueres marsh on the west with for Newinaws marsh oil the north with Nicholas Phillipes marsh on the South by (lie coninani

Haiti, an acre of fresh marsh gitien to Edward Rate bounded on the East with the greate Swainin, on the west with air Gloueres on the north with the high way on the South with Ralph Shepperds lot Gillen to Edward Bate haffe an acre of marsh Upon grals, Hand.


            TUP LAND OF JOHN ALLIS

ffive acres on the plaine first granted to Thomas A legate bounded on the F 5t by a lot of Joseph Shawes on the East &, South w.Yt)9 on tile West by Ralph Xiiiin, lot the sea on the north two acres at the Smile bounded with the sea Eyght a, res oil the wester necke the land of I lenry Kingulan a. 'iIC F~St Thomas Hol. bcooke oil the west thc .nHoo. on the north first granted to Ceorge Allin Two acres and a quarter twelve Rod of meddow in the Wester neck first gitien to (;vorgt, Allin bounded on the East with the marsh of Richard Siluester on the west with the marsh of Williani ffrie tile sea on the north the land of Henry Kinglitall Oil tile South


            THE LAND OF JOSEPH SHAW

Six acres in the Wester neck 3 acres of it first giuen to John Berstow buting Upon the sea East and north the land of John King on the South tire other 3 acres first granted to Richard Porter the former 3 acres achoyning on the west i ... d the [all(] of John Allin on the north the sea on the east Raffe Allines land on the South Three acres Upon King Oke hill first granted to John Whitmarsh Richard Addarr" land on the East John Reades on the west the highway oil tile north the land of John Harding on the South


          '111E LAND OF WALTER HARRIS

Air acce and a Italic in the west flueld first giuen to Robert Louell bounded on the north by the land of John Whitman on t East by the strecte on the south by the land of Robert Louell on the west fly tire land of Thomas Doget Eygilt acres 1~ ing in Harriscs Raing first giurn to Waiter Harris being a tryangle bounded oil t1w East by a suanific on tile south by the land of John Upham and on the west by a swarripe Eyght acres in the mill furlonge first given to him the saied Walter Hat,is bOLIndell (III the East by the land of Richard Siluester on the west by tire Imid of Thomas Rider on the south by the land of Phillip Reade


            GENERAL HISTORY 185


          THE LANV OF NICHOLAS WHITE

ffolNer acres upon the plaine 3 acres first giuen to Steeplien firench the other first gitien to John Whittriarsh the land of John Ozborn oil the East tire land of Edward Bate to tile west the trayning greene on the north tire swampe on the south ffixe acres upon the plaine 3 acres of it first granted to William Smith and two acres to John Rolleres the lane that ledeth to the trayning greene oil the East the land of Nicholas Phillifics on tire west the trayning greene oil the north Nicholas Phillips on the south an acre and halle the swampe oil the East the land of Edward Poole on the south tire high-way on tire west

an acre of salt marsh first granted to William Richards the marsh of mr Ginter oil the East of Nicholas Phillipes on the west and north the necke oil the south lower acres in the swampe


          THE LAND OF JOHN HOLLESTER

Twoacresand halfe inthe westifield first granted to William Howland bounded on east west and south by the hiewayes and on the north by the land of Edward Smith flower acres in Harrises Rainge first granted to William Howland bounded on the East try the highway on the West against a little Swarope on the north by tire land of Williant Carpenter oil the South the land of Thomas Clifton on the north -

            THIL LAND OR JOHN BURGE

Two acres in liarrises Rainge first granted to Mesechill Barnard buting on tire East upon a little swanipe on the west upon a swainpe the huld of our Webb on the south of John Upham on the north


          THE LAND OF AINGELL HOLLARD

fifive acres in the East ffinid first granted to him hounded no tl,, East fly the ]sort of ~honias Rawlines on the west by tire roullway William Read on the North slid Thomas Streame on the South

Eyght acres in tile East fineld first granted to Wide%%, Streame Nathaniel Addain" his meddow on the East the mill waie on the west ... I the north with a lot that was granted to joane Richardes and Steephen ffrench on the south

Three acres granted first to joarre Richardes the mill waie on the west slid lying north and south Two acres and haffe of mcdow at hocklic at first granted to Clement Brigges bounded with a cr~k and Edward Beonctes marsh on the East and Steephen ffrench his lot oil the west

Twenty three acres aniongst the great lotes, bounded with the hill I
cKani . me
one tire East and south the niarsh of ni~ Richards on the north mr Ri ard his
lot on the west
          THE LAND OF WILLIAM READE

Eyght acres and lialfe fit the East field at first giucn to him tire land of Thomas Rawlines on the Fast of Richard Addames on the west tire swampe on tire north the Streete on the south

Eyght acres and halfe in the Wester neck the land of Richard Siluester oil the East of Edward Smith oil the west the Highwaie that ledeth to Siluesteres on the north the commons on the south Two acres of salt marsh in the westerneck the marsh of nar jener on the East of Thomas White on the west the land of William Richardes oil the north the Creek ,I the south Sixteene acres amongst tile goeate lotes bounded on the East with a greate pond by the commons oil the west


            THE LAND OF FDWARU, POOLE

ffive acres one the plaine the streete on the East the land of Ralph Allin on the west of Richard Rowlaml oil tire north and of Richard Bowin oil the south

T,v, a, ces at tire steping storic the swampe oil the East tire highway oil the west the land of Ralph Shepherd on tire north of lor Newman on the South

186 GVNERAI, HISTORV

          THE LAND OF RicNARD ADDVIIES

Nice acres in tile ["List field first granLed to him bounded oil the East with theIan(] of William Readon the west with the land of Richard Newberry the slvainfle oil tile north the sircere oil the south

Fowerteene a( res on the wester neck fli st granted to him bound on tile East with the hold of Edward Smith on the west with the land of William Smith oil tile north with a Swainpe one the south with tile commons

An Acre of Saft, Marsh at the wester neck first granted to William Reade and an acre and Italic of Upland first granted to car Bosley bounded on the East fly the late] of Thomas White and of William Richardes on tile west with tile marsh of Thomas holbrooke on tile north with tile land of William Richardes oil tile south by tile Creek that Buries to monotticot

At, Acre of Marsh at burying Hand the land of Robert Martin on tile mest with tile sea oil tile north with tile marsh of mr Parker of Rbert Martin on tile south

Three acres of fresh Marsh the marsh of John Harding and Stephen ffrench on (tic East tile niedow of Edward Smith on tire west tile common oil the north and south

An Acre oil King oke hill the land the hiewaies at the East anti north entles the Iand if John Harding and Joseph Shaw on tile north and of Thomas Dyer oil tile south

Twenty fewer acres amongst the greate lotcs buted on the East with a greatt, pond oil the west with the common with the lot of Richard Silue.,ter oil the north with tile lot of William Smith on the South


          THE LAND OF RonLur RANDOLL

Two acres in tile East field first granted to John Gurny bounded on tile East with the land of E (intend hart the bie,,aie on the west tile land of Robert Cooke on tile north and of Nathaniel Addames oil the south

Two acres more in Past field first gitien to Edward Bate bounded on the East will, the ]anti of Edmond Harte with the land of Robert Cooke on the west Nathaniel Acklarnes on the north and his ow.e oil the south

Three acres more in the Fast field first granted to James Rogeres bounded with the sea on the East Nathaniel Addames on the west and south the sea on tile north


            THE LAND OF WILLIAM PITTY

Ten acres in tile Ester neck first granted to him bounded with James Ludines land on tile East of Nicholas Phillipes on the west a Swampe an tile north and a hieway oil tile south

three acre, of Salt-marsh lyinge neare tile null bounded with the land of Joseph Torrey on the north the mill on the south the mill lot on the west Five Acres of Upland at london Berge bounded on the East with tile Sea the land of inr Torric oil tile west of air Waltham oil the north and the Round orarsh on the south


            THE LAND Or jouN BURRELL

Three acres in tile Rainge first granted to Nicholas Notion bounded with a highwaie on the East the land of Thomas Baylie on the west the land of Iluell Roe oil the north and the land of Goodinin Hughes oil the south

Ali Acre in King oke hill tile Ian(] of Thomas Dyer oil the East and north tile hiewan, on the west the land of air Webb on the south

Two acres in the Rainge first granted to lDr Robert Jeffery 1) ... tilde(] on the Eist with a hiewaic on the west with a swanipe oil the north with a biwaic on the south ith tile land of Thomas Clildon


            GENERAL HISTORY 187


          THE LAND OF SAMUEL NEWMAN


Twenty fewer acres in th F at frield thirteene acres of it was first granted to Henry Kingman Scuen of ~t

i to William Smith anti fowe, acres first to William Richardes all of it together bounded on the East with a Highway by the meeting house tile land of Robert Martin )it the smith &air niarsh oil the west tile counnon

i the north

Two acres of salt marsh first granted to Henry Kingman bounded on the East with a swanipe on the west with the highway the land of Edward Poole oil the North and the land of Edward Bate on the south

Two acres of salt marsh mic of them first granted to Henry Kingnian the other to Thomas White bounded at the East with the land of Nicholas Phillipes and Edward Bate westward with a bridge south with the cornon northward with the land of Richard Bowill

Two acres of swampe bounded oil the East with the East fieldes on the west with his owne salt marsh on the south with tile swampe of Edward Bate

Twenty acres of upland first granted to Henry Kingman hounded on the south a greate pond on the north with joint Randes marsh

'I'wenty acres of upland ant] swanipe giulai him by the Towne bounded oil the East with the land of William Hewes the land of Thomas Holbrook on the west the Cornons on tile south Harrises Rainge on tile north

Two acres of wood in a great swarope, neere my Howse first giuen Edward Bate now taken by way of exchange of him for two acres in the Swanipe aforesd shone specy,fied


            THE LAND OF JOHN TAYLOR


Three acres in tile plaine first granted to Robert Louell the highwaie on the East the land of William Brandon On the nth the land of John ffussell on the north


          T1114 LAND OF RICHARu NEWDERY

Two acres in tile Last field first giuen to Richard Addafties bounded on tile East with the land of Richard Addames on the west and south with the highwaie on the north with the wachhouse hill

ffive acres in the wester neck first gmen to jor Hull bounded on the East with the land of mr Jener on the west with the land of John Whitman on the north to the Sea oil the south with inr Jeneres niavsh


          Tini LAND OF TncoiAs CLIFTON

Six acres in tire west field fower acres first granted to ,it Robert jeffiric and two act" first granted to William Hues bounded oil the East with the highway on the west with a swanifie on the north with the land of John Burrell on the south with the land of John Holester

Two acres in Harrises Rainge first giuen to Samuel Butterworth bounded oil the East with a swamp on tile west with a swample on the north with the land of Jacob ffrench on the south with the ]anti of William Carpenter


          Tim LAND OF THOMAS FFOSTER

Thre,v at ce, in the East ffield first granted to John Aflin bounded on the East with Jeffery Staples land on tile west with the land of Edward Bate


            THE LAND OF WD.LiAxt RFADL

Tcnn acres in the East flield three acres first granted to Robeit Stone three acres of it to George Allin lower acres to Richard Knight bounded on tile East with thi, land of Nathaniel Addanics on tile west with the streete on the south Ntith the lanti of Aingell holaid oil the. north with the land of Thomas ffoster

188 GENERAL HISTORY

            THE LAND OF RALPu ArtrlN,

TttentN burst granted to George Allin lying in tire Fasterneck and three In I el oleddOW 11(60~'llillg to it bounded on the East with the land of Richard li.win oil the wc,j ith the Sea an the north with the land of Fdward Pools on the south ith the sea

Ali acre of salt inarsh first granted to Thomas White bounded oil the east with the highwaiQ art tile west with his ownit marsh on the north with the highwaie on tile Solith with tile sea

((,.,r ;i, Oa that was best granted to 'I fionias Rider bounded on tire east with the land of Joseph Shaw oil the west with the land of Do Ginner on the north Zuni ~(Altll With the sea

-two acres of salt marsh first granted to George Allin bounded on the cast .ith (lie marsh of Robert Martin on the west to the sea on the north to the marsh of Oil Parker oil tire south to the marsh of Richard Addames


            THE LAND OF EDMOND HART

Eleiven acres in the East field first granted to him bounded oil the East and west ith highwaies on the north with the land of Thomas Rider on the South with the land of Jain" Snooke

Three acres in K~ngoke hill first granted to Aingell Hollard bounded on the Fiv,t with a highwate on the west with the land of John Uphom on the north writh tire land of Thomas Rider on the South with the land of mr Parker Eyghtecne acres amongst the greate lotes bounded oil the East with the great pond on tire west with tire comon on tire north with the land of Robert Louell on the South with the land of Thomas Rawlines


            THE LAND OF JAMES SMITH

'I InCe in the Eastecrock bounded on the East with the highwaie the hold of lenient Brigges on the west on the north with the Sea on the south with the land of William "ayard

One acte of salt marsh bomicied with the sea on tile East the sea on the west flie land of William Pitty oil the north of James Ludin the south


            THE LAND OF JOHN FFUSSELL

Twcf,e acres air([ babe in tire plaine six acres of it first gitien to Robert Attie three acie, of it first gitien to Thomas Holbrooke half an acre first gmen to nit B,nrFu d and the other three acors first giren to William Newland all of it bounded oil tire East with tile land of Robert Abell Clement Weauer and ut Barnard oil tile west with the highwilic, on the north with a lot of ground giuen to itir Barnard .it tin, south to the land of John Taylor


            THE LAND OF RICHARD WEIDI

T,o a,,cs in the Fast field bought of or Robert Lerithail bound on the East with the land of the Widow Streone on the north with in, Newmanes land air th( west with the ]air,] of Robert Martin on the south with the highwaie

Two acres in Kingoke hill first giuen to Thomas Rawlims bounded on the ,;i,t w ith air Parkerts; land oil tire west the Iii hwaie on the north with the land ,if John irlihani of Phillip Reades on the soM

Ifi%c core, in liarrises Rainge 3 akres of it first gitien to Masuchiell Barnard I,o of t1nni first guicii to John Butterworth bounded on the east with a highwaie ," tile west with the land of Joint Holester on the north with Jacob ffrench his land

An ac-re and three (juarteres in Kingoke hill bounded on the East with land Of 'I'll(illaS 1)) er On I IC West and booth with highwaie oil tire north with tire la ... I of John Bultell


            GENERAL HISTORY 189


Six acre, and half bought of John Dunford lying in mill field bounded oil the ~.a~t with land of Joint Harding oil tire west with a highwaie oil the south with he land of Dauid Mattoke

Three acres of ffresh licarsh adioyning to the marsh of Phillip Reade oil the south west side


          THE LAND OF NICHOLVS NORTON,

Six acres in luill ffield 3 of them first guren to Richaid Addanics 3 to Richard Siblester b..nded oil the east with the land of Hit Waltham or, Richards a,.(] Matthew Pratt oil the west of John Gill oil the north on the south with tile land ,if Sinion WhitanIrsh

f-ive acres adioyning to John Whitroants greate lot bounded on the east with tire mill lot on the west to it Parkeres lot of James Naish to the north of John Whittlian on the seat),


            , I'RIE LAND Of JOHN H kRDING

Fower acres in the west field two of them first granted to Thomas Houlbrooke and tire other two to joint Whaniarsh bounded on the East with the high waie ,,.I the west with tire land ofThromas Doget on tire north with the land of Robert Louell on the south with tire land of Edward Smith

ffive acres on Kingulne hill first granted to joint 'Xilitniarsh bounded oil tire Fast with the land of Joseph Shaw on the west with the highway on the north with the land of Phillip Reade on the south with the land of Richard Addaines Six acres in the mill field first granted to himselfe bounded on the East with the land of James Naish on the west with a swanipe on the north with the land of James Naish on the South with tile land of HIT Webb and Datrid Mattoke

Two acres and halfe off fresh Marsh 5-r g-arted to John Whi~.,rarsh bounded on the East with the inarsh of Henry Addames oil the East of Richard Addannes, on the west the comon on the north and south

Halls an acre of fresh marsh more adioYning to it which lice gaue to John Whitmar,li, the sonn of the aforesaid John Whitnuirsh


    THE LAND OF NICHOLAS ONIESH'HERUS AND RICHARD WHITMARSH

Nine acres in the westerneck first gmen to John Whitmarsh their father deceased bounded on the swampe in the west with the marsh of John Allin oil the north with a swunipe on the south with the land of John Allill


          THE LAND OF SIMON WHITMARSH

flower acres and halfe in the mill field 2 acres and haffe first granted to John Whitmarth bounded on the East with a swampe on the west with the land of William Brandon on tile south with the mill waie oil the north with the land of Niel .. his Norton the other two acres first granted to John Harding adioyning to the six acres of the ~.ied John Harding bounded on the East and north with the land of James Nai6h


          TuE LAND OF RICHARD WALING

ffoweracresand halft, oil the Back sideof King oke hill 3 acresof it first granted to John Upham and the other acre anti halfe to hiniseffe bounded oil the East with the conninons on the west with tire mill path on the. north with tire land of George Allin on tire south with the land of William Brandon

'rhree acres in mill field first giuen to hini the land of Jacob ffrench on the East the coinon oil the west the land of Hugh Roe on tile north of mr Parker oil the sooth

on quarter of an acre in the west flueld first gins to air Hull bounded oil the east with the highwaie oil the west anti north with the land of Joint Whitillan on the south with tire land of jefferey Staple

too GENERAL HISTORY

          THE LAND OF CLEMENT BRIGGES

Teno lit ill,- Vastci neck first granted to him bounded on the East with it 'MaillpC (at ill, xwst with the land of James Britton on the north with the sea ,in the outh ,ith the land of Clement Wetier

Two it, 0 , upon (lie net k at t lie fferry bounded wit lit lie Ian d of John At [in aml ill,, " i


            THE LAND OF GEORGE ALLiN

Three acre., in Kingolie hill first granted to Robert LOUCII bounded on the north with thc land of Hugh Roe on the south with the land of Richard Willing


          THE LAND OF MArTHEW PRATT

Tit,,nty acres in the Hill field twelve of them first gmen to Edward Bate and E.yglit acres to hiruselfe all of it bounded on the East with the land of John Gill oil the west with the land of Richard Willing on the north with the Rocky hill oil the south with the ]anti of Richard Addames and Thomas Baly

Also Eighteene ackers of upland first giuen to Edward Bennet now in the po.ession of maithew Pratt bounded on the cast with the mill River on the west with Joint Alilutnums lot oil the north with ye mill ground on the south with the pond


          THE LAND OF WILLIAAt TORREY

riventy acres sixteene of upland and fewer Of S44 .-.--sh first giuen to Capt Sillanouat bounded on the east with the land of nic Henry Waltham on the west with the high waie on the north with the land of James Ludden on the south with his owne land bought of Richard Porter

glit a( res of upland first gmen to Richard Porter bounded on the east with Im!d of William Pitty oil the west with a swampe on the north with his owne aboue mentioned on the south with the land of nn~ jefferey

Three acre~ first gmen him by the towne bounded oil file east with the back river on file west with the Iaiid of air jefferie on the north with the land of William Pitty on the south with mr jenerers marsh

Three acre, of suit marsh lying on the backer river first giuen to Richard Porter bounded oil the East with the land of Aingell Hollard on the west with the River in file moth with the land of m,, Richards on the south with the land of mr Henry Waltham

Sixteerre acres lying abome the mill first gmen to Calif Sillanoua oil the east with -- oil file we,t with the back River oil the north with - on the south

ith - --

Two shares mid haffe upon the Easter neck containing by esteniat twenty five. acres first gitien to Hir John Busleni bounded on the Last with the land of Nicholas Phillipes oil the Rest with the land of James Ludden on the north with the bay On file South with the back River

Ali acor (if salt marsh first gitien to mr John Buslem bounded on the East with the back liner 0. file west with his owne on the north with the land of John King and James Smatics marsh on the south with mr jefferies marsh

Twenty and lower acres of upland upon Round Bond fowervene acres of it first gitien it) Thomas I lolbrooke ten a, res gitien to John Kinge bounded on the Ea,t with the. land not yet gmen oil the west north and south with the sea


            THE LAND OF PHILLIP READE

hit e acres upon Kingolo, hill two acres of it first ginen to hiniselfe three a, 'es to Join] keade oil the East with the land of Joint Read on the west with the high %vaie oil the north with the land of mr Webb on the south with the land of [iihn I larding


            GI,NFRAL HIS'IORN' 191


11.1', of ffr,sh marsh two acres first gmen to John Read and two acres
lo Du,,Ii, b~amdedon the East withahigh waieon thrixest withasmampe,
lijin I~tads marsh on the north lit, Webs and Thomas RawlHO; marsh on tile
"Aull
            THE LkND OF JOHN RoGERFS

H(VA%Ll au'Lls ill the west ffield first gmen to himselle bounded oil the Fast with
t1O. land of Thomas Doget on file west with the high waic and on the south: on
ila north with John Whitmans salt marsh
Nine acres in the wester neck first gmen to Aingell Hollard bounded with a
high maie oil the East the Conion on the west with Richard Siluestercs land On
it., north anti the land of Edward Belief on the south
()He acre of salt inarsh near burying Hand bought of Hir Newman bminded On
ill, Ea,t with Tho Whites marsh on the west with jur Parkeres it the south
,601 the land of Robert Martin oil the north with file sea
Al'o twenty pole or thereabout be it more or less Lying at the head of the
aull ],took for a watering place bounded on the south side will a white oak on
ill,- niarsh with his owne Land & taking in the River on the East on the west
,,Hit the land of Widdow Oati,

          THE LAND OF ARTHURE WARREN

T'nn acres of upland and suarripe first giuen to biniselfe bounded on the East
will) ol' GlOnleres marsh on the west and south with mr Barnardes land on the
roath 1)), the sea
T,on acres in the mill Ifield Killen to h;rnse!'z bounded oil the last and south
%%i;lk ifingain line on the nort with the ]anti of Walter Harris the coumn on
IIo- i%clt
          THE LAND OF RICHARD SILUESTER

Twemy and is acres Pon the Wester neck fowerteene of them first giuen to

    him"Ife and twelve to John Uphara bounded on the East with a high waic the on the west the land of Win Resole oil the north the land of John Rogeres south

it .... c. acres first giuen to himselfe abome file mill bounded oil the East with

llij~gain line on the west with the land of John Rogeres on the north with the Ian I if lit, Torrey on file south with the south with the land of Walter Harris I l%o acres of salt marsh first gmen to himselfe bounded with nir jeners land

,ill the E'ast John Allines on the west the Rmer on the north the conion oil the
'oulli
            THE LAND OF JOHN STAPLE

.';,x acres in the plaim, three acres of them first gmen to lar Barnard and three
~4 th to Henry Kingman bounded on the East with the land of Robert Able
,in ill( wcFt and north with the highwaie William Brandon the south Three
.11.11 in the East Ifield first gitien to himselfe the land of William Read on the

I ,,t lit, land of Edmond Hart on the west the land of Hit Jeffery oil the north ,nd -if mr Parker on the south


            THE LtN11 OF JOHN WHITMAN

I c,a) and oil acres in the west field fifteeme of them upland anti six acres ii 'aft nia"ll first giuen to ]or Hall bounded oil the East with a high waie on

lit, ,,,t i ... (I north with a creeke on the south with the land if Walter Harris llim~r inres anti halle oil the westclHeck bouroled oil the East with a creeke

-iii 11ho ,,t "it], rurdow on the west the land of Thomas Streator, on the north ind ilit Ian([ of Hit jener on the south

litino a(res in Harrises Rainge first gitien to hiniselfe the land of William
    Ilio, a, ill, East a swainpe oil the west the land of Hugh Roe oil the north and \,,,,,all (... the south

19) GENFRAL HISTORY

Sistv acre, Irv the great pond first gille, to air Half bounded oil tile East with th, land of Wifliain Caipenter on the west with a swarope and the pund on the south

Ifo, ir acre, Of ffi ,h trial ~11 firA gi tie a to mr If it I I bounded wit li a cree ke on the Va,t and F(h~ald lien'tes marsh oil tile south


            THE LXND OF WAIJER COOKE

ff,i,,, arvS in Ou, Wsturneck fita gitten to Thornies BaAlie bounded on (tie Ea.,t with tire ]and of Thoinas Holbrook on the west With the land of John Hotholok and Zakery Reades on tile west the highmay on the north the columns on the solull

Ali acre upon Round Hind first giuen to 1homas Hoibrooke bounded on the East all,] west with the sea on the north and south with In, Torries land


            THE LAND or EDWARD SMITH

ffiN,acresand haffe in thewest field threeacresandhaffe first giuen to Richard Porter and two acres to Robert Lotiell the strecte on the East the highwaic oil the west the land of John Harding on the north and of John Holester on the south

Ten acres and haffe in the westerneck Fight acres and lialfc, first giuen to Willi,on Ruade and two acres first gitien to Richard Addaines bounded on the East and west with the conion on the north with the land of Richard Addames oil tile south with tile land of William Reade

Three acres of ffresh inarsh first gmen to Steephen (breach bounded oil the Fast with Richard Addames marsh the reforms on tile west and north the fresh Brooke on the south


          THE LAND OF HENRY KINGMAN

Twelue acres in the westerneck first gitien to John Whitniarsh bounded on East with the land of Nicholas Onisepherus and Richard Whitmarsh on the west with the land of John Allin the sea on the north the land of Thomas Hotbrooke on the south

Three acres in the westerneck first giuen to William Smith bounded on the East and south with the land of William Smith on the north with the land of Thomas White oil the South with the con-um

Three acres first giuen to Edward Poole bounded on the East with a higbwaie on tile west with the ]arid of William Hayard, on the north with the land of Enoch HUnt I'll the south with the land of Ralph Allin

f1hower acres first giuen to George Allin bounded on the East with a high waie on the west with the sea his owne land on on the north and the land of Ralph Aili. on tile south

Three ac,,., in the Easterneck of salt marsh first gmen to mr Buslem bounded oil the north With the bay on the south with the back Ricier

Two acres of Suit marsh neere burying Hand first gitten to Aingell Holard bounded oil tile East and south with the land of Robert Martin on the west with the creeke on the north with mr Parkers marsh

Six acres in the westerneck first giuen to Samuel Butterworth bounded on the East will, the comion on the west with a highwaie


            THE LAND OF THonAs DYER

Seurn acres on Kingoke hill six acres of it first ghten to Thomas HulbrookQ tile other acre to Robert Liniell bounded on the Past and west with two high waies on the north With the land of Richard Addanies on the south with the land of Robert Louell and John Burrell

Two acres of swimpe first itillect to John Upham bounded on the East with a highway and on tile north on the west with the commons one the south with the land of James Naish


            GENFRAL Hlq-1'1PX' 193


          THE LAND OF NATHANIEL ADDAMUS

acres in the East field tower of them first gicien to Matthew Pratt three of them to the wife of Thomas Clapp and fewer to William Brandoribounded on the East with the land of Robert Randoll and Robert Cooke or, the west ,ith the land of James Snooke on the north with a swampe on the south with .L highwaie

Elener, acres and a quarter in the East field eyght acres of it in upland and In a, res and quarter of salt marsh first giuen to Clement Brigges bounded oil I c East with the land of Robert Randoll on the west with the land of Aingell Hillard on the north on the north with the land of William Reade on the south with tile coinon

Three acres giuen him in lieu of a highwaie bounded on the East with the back Rmer on the west with the land of Aingell Hollard on the north with his owne land on the South with the land of Stetillien fibench

Two acres in the East Ifield first giuen to joint Gurnie bounded on the Last ,ith the land of Jeffery staple on the west with the land o( Robert Randoll on tile north with the Ceder swampe on the south with the highwaic

Fighteene acres in the East ffield first gitien to nor Buskin ficifteene of it giuen fir,t to m, Parker bounded on the East with a pond adioyninge to Edmond I lartes lot on the west with the land of mr Jefferies on tile North .411 the land of John Staple on the south with a plot of coinon


            THE LAND OF WILLIAM SMITH

Vyglitcene acres in the westerneck first gitien to himselfe the cornones on the Ea,t and west The land of John Tonnon and John Holbrook on the north the land of Richard Addames on the south

Two acres of salt marsh bounded on the East with the Creeke on the west .ith William Richards marsh Robert Martines land on tile north

Thirty acres in the greate lotes the land of Richard Acklames oil the East of '~tecphcn ffeench on the west the confirm on the north and the greate pond on the "nith

            THE LAND or THomAs WHITE

flowerteene acres in the westerneck first giuen to himselfe bounded on tile I c,t With a highwaie on the west with the conion on the north with the land ,,i Thomas Dunn on the south with the land of John Hothrolike and John Tom-


On arre of of salt marsh wich was first giuen to William Reade bounded on the I -,t,t with William Reads marsh of Richard Addanies on the west the sea on the north air Jeneres upland on the South

fin a, n, of salt marsh by burying Band first giuen to me Newroan bounded ul it)(- F a,t to me Newmans land (5n the west with a creeke on the north with On- marsh of Ephraim Hunt Of John Rogeres on the south

1',,i-.1ty and one acres amongst the greate lots first giuen to himself bounded -11 the East with the land of Thomas Jerver senior of Tliokua~ Doget on the west ,be loolons on the north the pond on the south

%I,,- one act, be it more or less bounded with the highway on the south & the inill (',,ck, on the north the land of Robte Randall oil the cast & the way to I li, out oil the west as it is marked out which sd land was allowed him in Con,61,rlti.u:aoI,luiH1 layd out for the Country highway rovided Deacon Roger, h, e I b,rty to come through with his haye he setting vp the fence agayne


            THE LAND OF JAMES LUDDON

    11 -c, fil,t giuen to hirieselfe bounded on the East with a highwaie on the "I'll a plot of comon to the Easterners on the north to the land of William

al tile s'ath
la,, .~, ,, of alt marsh first giuen to hunselfe, bounded on the East with
194 GENERAL HISTOR)

11ir jelferies marsh tile high waie to the west James Smithes marsh on the north and of ~H~ Tortey in tile south A halfe acre of salt marsh addioyning to the other t at lice bought of nir Torrie


            THE LAND OF JEFFERY STAPLE

Three acres in tile East fifield first giuen to hijuselfe bounded on the East with ,,ith tile lad of Thomas Ifoster if Thomas Streame on the west of Edward Benet ,,it tile north the mill path on the south

Six acres at tile farther end of Harrises Rainge first giuen to hiniselfe bounded on the Last with the con-ion oil the west with the land of mr Newman on the north with the land if William Hughes of John Butterworth on the south

Halle all ac'e, in the west field first giuen to HIT Hilli the streete on the East div land of John Whitman on the west and south of Richard Waling on the south


            THE LAND OF JAMEs PRIST

Oil acre in King Oke hill first gmen to Edward Benet bounded on the East with tile streete that ledeth to the mill James Snookes land on the north Edward Benel oil the west the land of Thomas Rider on the south

Two acres in the East fifield first gmen to William Hughes bounded with the land of Thomas Rider im the East the highway to the west the land of William Hughes to the north and south


          THE LAND OF MARTIN PHILLIPES

Three acres and halfe first gmen to Thomas White bounded on the East with the land of Nicholas Phillipes on the west with the land of Richard Bowin the waie on the north and of Richard Bowin on the South

Oil qcr, of salt marsh first gmen to William Richards bounded with the marsh Of Nicholas Phillipes on the west with mr Newmans marsh with the land of Nicholas Phillipes on the north and a crecke on the south


            THE I-AND OF JOHN FFOSTER '

Two acres and halfe first giuen to John Taylor bounded on the East with tile land of William Werchon on the west with the land of Nicholas Byrani on the north with the sea south with the land of mr Glouer

Two acres upon the plaine first giuen to William Richardes bounded on the East with the land of Nicholas Whit on the north with the land of Nicholas Phillipes with a swampe on tile south


            TuE LAND OF ANDREW FFORD

Sciven acres in the East fild first giuen to Masachill Barnard on the East with Ecinuand Harts Ian(] on the west and north with the land of air Jener on the south with the Indiancs land


          THE LAND OF MASACHEL BARNARD

Six acres in the plaine first giuen to Richard Longe bounded on the East with the land of Arthure 'Warre. of John ff tv~ell on the west the sea on the north and his owne land on the sonith

Three acres in the plaine first giuen to Thomas Baylie bounded on the East with the land of Clement Weaue, ,,I the west and south with the land of J ohn f1mell of Artbure Warren oil the north

Fight acres in the mill field first gmen to himselfe bounded Fast and south with Ilinghani land oil the west with the Conion on the north with the land of Walter Harris


            GENERAL HISTORY 195


            THE LAND OF JAMES SNOOKS

i)n acie in Kingoke hill first gitien to Edward Benet bot ... ded On the East with I h, 1,11d of mr Parker of James Prist oil the west of Edward benet on the north

Three acres, in the East fifield first gmen to Edward Sale bounded on tile East ,ith the land of Nathaniel Addames of Edmond Hart on tile west a swanipe

the north to the streete on the south

I laree acres in tile mill field the land of Nicholas Norton on the East of Thomas I, [,lw oil the west a swampe on the south the mill foote path on the north

On acre of salt marsh at the back rmer first gimal to Robert Able almost Round with the sea the seda, wampe on the west of it


            THE LAND OF RICHARD BowiN

Tenn acres Eyglit of them upland two of swampe lying in the plaine first gitien to I'louna. White bounded oil the East with the land of Martin Phillipes of Ralph [Allird oil the west of his owne on the south a highwaie on the north

Two acres of upland and salt marsh first giuen to Tho White bounded on tile East with tile conion on the west with the land of Ralph Allin on the north with his owne land on the smith with John Uphams marsh

Two wors first gmen to John King bounded on the East west & north with Ili., ow lie load and of nir Newman on the south


          THE LAND OF WILLIAm RICHARDES

Nineteen acres and halfe in the westernecke first giuen to nir Buslem bounded ,,.I the East with the sea the land of Richard Addames on the west of Robert Martin on the north of Thomas Streame on the south

Taoacres of salt marsh in the same neck first giuen to William Smith bounded en the East with William Smithes marsh with the sea oil the west and north mid with the land of Robert Martin on the south

flower acre. in the same neck first gmen to hiniselfe bounded on the east & noith with the land of Henry Kingman a high waie on tile south


            THE LAND oF RoBERT TYTUS

Six acres in the plaine 3 of them first giuen to George Allin 3 to Arthure Warren bounded on the East with a highwaie on the west and north with high waies oil the south with the land of John Osborne

flower acres on the other side first giuen to James Ludden the greate swarnix, being on the west and south of it

Oil acre of ffresh marsh at his dore beinge at the north end of tile greatte swampe

            THE LAND oF EDWARD BENET

Ifive acres in Kingokehili first giuen to hiniselfe bounded on the East with the land of James Snacks with a high waie on the west the Pounde on the north tin, Ian([ of Thomas Rawlinges on the south

Twenty and two acres in the westerneck 14tn of them giuen him by the lowne and eight of them first giuen to Aingell Bullard bounded on the Fast and west with highwaies on the north with the land of John Rogeres of mr Ginner inj the south

Five acres in the East field 2 acres first giuen him by Towne and 3 acres first ginen to Thomas White bounded on the East and north with the land of Nathaniel Adda ... es oil the west with the land of William Reside of Thomas Rawlinges on lie south

Six acres at hockley first giuen to himselfe bounded on the East with the Ritier Ili, nieddow on the west the coition in tile south

Oil acre of salt marsh at the back liner first gmen to himselfe the Tiller on Ili, east and south the land of Steephen ffrench oil the north of Joseph Torrie ial tile west

196 (,ENERAL HISTORY

On acre it ... I it quarter of salt marsh at ho(khe bounded with his owne land on tit,- F,st Aingell flolard on the west the riucr oil the l~i~h tire ]all,! of Steeplien fo,nch on the south

0. at,,t, of ffrc,li nrush bounded with john Whitmanes marsh on the East of ThOolarS Hollarooke on the west the canneries oil tire north file river on the south


            THE LAND or ENOCH HUNT


Twenty and two acres in the plaine twenty acres of it upland and two acre. of ,.lit marsh first 9113to to Richard Siluester and John Uphani bounded on the East with the land of me Ginner on the west and north with the sea the highway awl tire land of Dir Jener on the south

Oil acre of salt marsh neare burying Band bounded on the East and South aith the land of Oil Newman tire sea on the west the land of John Upham Oil the north


THE LAND OF THOMAS DOGLT DURING THE LIFE OF HIS WIFE ANT) AFTERWARDS
To ELIZABETH AND MARY FFRIE IDS DAUGHTERES OF WILLIAM FFRIE DE
CEASED

Ifower acres in the west Iffield first guren to William frie bounded on the East with the land of Edward Smith and John Hardinge the land of John Rogeres car the south of John Whitman oil the north a highwane on the South

Twelue acres amongst the greate lutes bounded on the East with the greate pond oil the west with the u6mon the north with the land of Thomas White of Robert Lotiell oil file south


        THE LAND OF ELIZABETH AND MARY FFRIE

Six acres i D mill field first given to William ffrie bounded on the East with a little pond Steephen Ifiench on the north the mill Rinse on the west

Two iu-,es of salt marsh in 2 seuerale pecles in the westerneck on pci, bounded with the marsh of John Alfin on the East the sea on the west jor jeneres marsh on the north the ]air(] of Henry Kingman oil the south the other facell bounded the East and south with the land of John Allin the sea on the west


            THE LAND OF ROBERT LOUELL

On acre anti a quar(er in the west flueld first giuen to him the land of Thomas Doget oil the west the streete on the East walter llarrises land on tire north John Ilaidinges on the south

Six acres and halfe in Kingoalihill first giuen to himselfe the highwaies on the East and west Thomas Dyers land on the north flughes; Roes on the south

fififterne acres neare the mill bounded (,,I the Fast with Hingant boundes ou tire west with mill Bitter tur Jefferies land on the north Steephen ffrenches oil tile south

Thirtic acre., in the greate tortes the pond on the Fast the conion on the west Thomas Dogetts land on the north Edmond Hartes on the south


            THE LAND OF JAMES NAISH

Six acres in mill field gmen him by the towne bounded on the east anti west with 2 swat ifles on the north with the mill weigh on the south the ]air(] of John
I larding M acres in the same plate 3 acres of it first giuen t TI A Cla
                            0 loall. s . 1)

3 acres of it to John flit kes bounded East and west with swampes on the nort i with tit(- Bell weigh the land of Jacob flurench on file South

          THE LAND OF STELPHEN IFFRENCH

Tenn acres in East fiefif giucn to hintselfe bounded oil the Fast with the land of \\illiain Hughes Tiniothie Wales land on the west a swanipc on the north a highwaie oil the south

              GENERAL HISTORY 197


ttliellohnind o(JfpbaonitTEauLno(u1eed1l oon the north of Thomas Doget south

Three acres of narsh first ghien to John Dpharn halle an acre of it at the back River the Rest at the fresh marsh bounded East and west with tire cantons on the north with Thonias 14olb,ookes marsh oil the south with henry Addames Marsh


            THE LAND OF JOHN GLOUER

Eight acres in the plame

          THE LAND OF Tuomks RAWLINGES

Three acres in the East fifield first gmen to VVilliant Reade bounded on the East with the land of Timothic Wales on tire west and north with the land of Wiliant Reade on the south with the strecte

Two acres in King oke hill first gmen to Aingle liolard bounded on the Fast with the ]slid of Tho Ride, on the west with the streete oil the north the land Of joint Upham Edward Berrets south

Three acres in East field first gmen to him bounded on the East with land of Angle flolard on the west with Will Reade Edwm (I Benetes on file north Aingle Holards on the south

On acre of suit marsh in the westerneck bounded on the East with Ralph Allme. land on the west with mr jeneres the conion on the north tire sea on the south

Oil acre and halfe of ffresh marsh first gmen to him lying amongst the greate lottes


            THE LAND OF JOHN UPDA&I

flower acres in King Okehill first giijen to himselfe bounded on the East with Edmond Hartes land on the west with a highwaie our Webbes land oil tire. north Thomas Rawlinges on the south

Two acres in hlarri~s Rainge Thomas Cleftones land on the East a highwaie on the west the land of walter harris on the north of John Burge on the south

Two acres of salt marsh with a little island adioVng to it called buryinge lland lit, Newmans land on the East the Sea on west Enerk f-bintes on the south

Thirty acres in the greate lottes the pond on the East the conlones on the west Steephen ftrcnch on the north


          THE LAND OF Tuost," RICIIARDES

ffiv~ acres of ffresh medduav lying at tire beginninge of the llingain bounties first gluten to tor Bosley bounded on tire north with the Rmer and with Aingell I lollards lot oil the south

Eighteene acres bounded on the East with llingani boundes Bar jefferies on the West Aingell lluilards on file South

Ifower acres in the mill flield first giuen to John Gurnie b(Hinded On the Fast with Nicholas Norton land on thE west with Richard Walinges on the north uith John Gilles on the south with William Brandones


          THE LAND OF WILLIAM CARPENTER

Two acres lit the west their] first gmen to Thomas Baybe the strecte on the East tire land of Thomas Baylie on the west and south by John liollester on the north

thower acre, in tht, mill flield first giuen to Thomas Baylie bounded on the East with uith the land of lit, Lenthall tire Ifigh wait, on the west Thomas Bathes land on tile north John Reades on tire south

Eighteene acres neare the ffiresh ljond, first ginen to Edward Benet bounded i'll file East with the Hill Bitter on the west with the land of mr flull the mill and oil the north with the poll,] on the south

198 GENERAL HISTORY

Three acres in Hatrises Rainge first guren to ar Hull bounded oil the East with it high waie on tht, west with a swampt, on tire north with the land of Henry Kingman on the South with Samucle Butterworths land

flox, er it, ties in Thucisrs Rifinge first gitien to Henry Kingman bounded nil the East with a highwilie oil tire west with a swainpe on the north with the land of Robert Martin on tire South with tire land of Joseph Hull

flower act" in Hanises Rainge first girren to Robert Martin bounded on the Fast with it high waie on the West with a swampe tire land of Samuele Butterworth on the north of Henry Kingman on the south

Two acres of ffresh marsh first giucir to William Hughes haife an acre of it I~ eth oil seueral spon, lying between the liticklebury pond and the fresh marsh one act, oil the west side of the Ritier that cometh into the south side of the greate pond and Indic an acre roore on the same Riuer mr Jener h auing marsh in the north end of it

          THE LAND OF ROBERT MARTIN

Ten acres in the East Ifield first gmen to Zakry Bicknell the land of Richard Webb on the East nit Newman on the north

ffive acr,s of salt marsh on the ~outh end of tire Same first gmen to Zakry Bicknell

Two acres of upland giuen to saied Robert Martin adicyning to it

Twelve acres and haffe in the wester neck first giuen to mr Joseph Bull bounded on the north with the sea the land of William Richards on the south the suit marshes on the east and west fifterne acres aboue the mill first gitien to Richard Longe bounder] oil the East with the pond on the west the mill Riuer on the west nd Mr. Torries land on the South

Twenty ami fewer acres amongst the greate tortes the land of Edward Sale on the north and of William Hughes on I _e South

Thirtie acres in the greate lots having the land of Arthure Warren on the north and of James Luddon on the South


The following sales are recorded in the same connection:

SOUld by EDWARD SMITH unto THOMAS DYER as followetb flive acres and hahe of land in the west Ifield three acres and halfe of it was giuen first to Richard porter and two acres of it first giuen to Robert Lomell and his Dwelling house: bante and sellar with the appurtenances there unto belonginge bounded on the East & west with highwaies on the north with the land of John Harding; on the small by joint Holbrook land

Allsoe three acres of ffrebh marsh which was first giuen to Steephen ffrench bu ... Died on the East by Richard Addames marsh on the West and north with tire conion on the south With the fresh brooke

Smid by THOMAS DYER unto THOMAS BAYLIE the 21,4 of the 3 month 1644
his dwellinge house harne and scilar his garden and yarde lurth of them con
ta - vning by Estimation on quarter of an acre of land being more or lease bounded
on the East with tire land of Robert Lomell on the west with tire land of mr Webb
oil the north with the land of saied Thorims Dyer and on the South a highwaie

Sould by EDWARD SMITH unto WILLIAM READE the 25th of the 3 month 1644 Temi acres and halite (if land in the wester neck Eight acres and haffe of it was fir~t giLleir to him the slied William Reach, two acres first girren to Richard Ad(kones bounded on the East with the land of the saied William Reade oil the west with the land of Millard Addames north and South with the coRions


Of the one hundred and thirty-eight landowners represented in
the above list, seventeen only belonged to the Hull Company of

1635, and only twenty-two are represented to-day by name among their descendants in the town. Seventeen of them were in the

Company of Rev. Samuel Newman, who emigrated to Rehoboth in 164C


            GENERAL HISTORY 199


LIST OF 1636
T~c ~arljest list of landowners, or men to whom grants were

own records, under date of 1636, probably nioiwidekinnoWwieySnforuotnh (tahlethtough evidently not the Original proprietors), copied from the original record, not now in existence.


1036 At a meeting in the Towne of Weymouth the 12th of - voted 'That for the greate lotts wee should lout unto every compleat person Ihouse holder] six - and unto ev~ry Indic passenger, trader twelve years of age to have three to the head. By all the freemen here present Whose names are underwritten. And tire place to begin is at the lower end of the thresh Pond, lWhitnlan's,l and to run eighty four Rodd either wards to the eat I


N
I Edward Bennet
2 Mr Joseph Unit 19
3 Henry Kingman 54
4 Mr Jenr ~rnior 42
Thramis 18
5 Whit e
6 William 1, 21
Robert LOV 12
7 ']1
A Edward 1Edm1ndJ Hart 34

N
9Thomas Rawling
10 Mr Jener, Jun
I I William Reed 45
12 Richd SiIV11t1r 18
13 Richd Addomes 24
14 William Smith 24
15 Stephen French 30
160, John Upham 21
30

These are all represented upon the list of property owners of 1643, while but tive of them are now represented by name among the inhabitants of the town. Of the above only Six belonged to the Hull Company of the Previous year.

              LIST OF 1651

The next list of property Owners is found upon the town records, under date of Nov. 26, 1651, of which the following is a copy:

The great lots named in the old tow, Book and formerly granted to be laid out on the East side of Presh Pond next to Nits Richard's mill joining the small lots formerly laid out butting on Flesh Pond to run 19 rods towards Hinghan, hoe and in case any lots run beyond tile Pond they hall be upon the same Line,

NAMES OF THOSE TO H-IVE LOTS 2 FEBRu-iRy 1651-52

Edward Soule [? Sal,j I
Robert Martin
Robert J,ff,,y 2
Arthur Warren 3
William r? James 4
Zachy Bicknell I Nash 5
James Luddoar 6
John Worster 7
Clement Bri 8
ggs 9
NIT Barnard 10
John Rog"F
Walter Harris it
E'liellezer Ailin 12
Widow Butt 13
William Ch elworth 14
ard
J-Does; Smith
16

M Claud 17
J-Jr,~Rccd
Throna a 18
John W Ad this 19
hionarsh 20
Thomas Holbrook
The Mill Great lot 21
William Pitty 22/3
Philip Reade 24
Skadinuel Butterworth 25
26
Ward 13WIC
Thomas de tie 27
Ruled Po~p g, 28
John Kin rt ci~r 29
Thomas Wayl,y 30
Henry Whitman 31
Mr Kingman 32
20( GENERAL HISTORY 0 be entitled
51 ,,Ile folloNing were found "" th,ef Gt~rceant`ancandt n,.t to Mrs.
t F'I"U'UN . 10 7.ast ~ide
to gre.t t lot~ ojd~v~d to 1), I,id out on the I e Or shalt be laid out first,
Richards unit to begu, next to the small lots win'll ai Fast . and on the ~reat lot$
b t Oil Hingliato line on the
"T, to " eac, to Pay
wilich go,a lot, . ~nt drilt-way between the two division'
l 0), ol'st, "I. cl,
In, ON", IlIeZISUM19 Is

R,b,lt Ston 2
Prut
~j r,allle 4
Robert I I'lli(w
Nichoiji, Norton 5
6
1;a1a", I Nlwahal
;,ttvl~ Staiilu 7
Blittill 11
9
1,~Iog,rs
, Byraffi 10
(xorge Allin, jull. 11
12
asig, \\rbitinan 13
,ondman Androsse I
join, Ringman .

John Staple 16
jet,, Curacy
John Alfin 17
John Harding 18
James Smith 19
,~Vijlj,m Brandin 20
James Nash 21
lane Moriss 22
Elder Bates 23
Thomas Rider 24
Goodman Weedoll 25
join, Holbrook 26
j b French 27

              LIST OF 1663


The rest general list is that of 1663 and ernbraces; the territory
upon the Nvest side of the town, boun~ing upon the Braintree line:

,fi, Selectmen fof Weyi-nouthl 14 Dec. 1663. The number of Acres
M"Gog of I Division begming, an Brauntry ly,,. as followeth
in cach persons lots, in tile first : of

            No ol N f


-%It. Benjamin Cilhain 14 2
Thmnas White - I
Deacon Phillip& 13 3
Ni,hok:v; Whitmar'll 5 4
thomas Whitman 5 5
John Guppie 7
Deacon Rogers 14 7
John St le 6 8
RicharNewbar'y 5 9
John Blake 8 10
'haw 4 11
6 12
'V11niaS , Char 1 13
IV n d o
Widow R,ad 7 1 4
Thomas Pratt
jmne~ Smith 5 1 5
J cho Whitnia0i 9 16
8 17
Thomas Dyer 1 18
joint Collier 4 19
171 20~
1dr Thither 83 21
I jugh But, 171 22
E'Ider Bale
Stephen F,ench 12 23
Walter Cook 5 24
James Luddon 9 25
( 26
John Thoillilson 10 27
Ridiald Porter 28
Andrew Fmd 6

            Aca,s Lst--

James Nash is 29
30
job, Osborne 7 31
Jolla Lovill
Thoulas Holbrook 10 32
John Burrell - 5 33
Henry Kingnian 13, 31,
John King, seaman 7 35
John Vining 5 36
Widow, Briggs 6 37
William PittY 12 38
Edward Panic (5 39
Edward King-an 5 40
Widow Otis 5 41
Samuel Butterworth 6 42
Widow Staple 4 43
William Fry 6 44
b French 4 45
6
Taylor 6 4
Widdow Saclike 4 47
Sarah Hour 6 48
7 49
Echmund Hart to 50
I In tfi~&ricu 51
Val-c at Pratt to
William Holbrook 9 52
Sam. Parker 4 53
lanies Lovill 8 54
Ephraim Hunt to 55
George Fry 7 56

            M, of No. of Attt, Lot..

Tluaoa~ Domi 6 57
John Holbrook 28 58
Richard Bolter 6 59
Phillip Read 6 60
James Priest 5 61
Mathew Pratt 4 62
John Harding 10 63
John King, planter 8 64
William Richards 5 65
Robert Randall 7 66
John Burg 7 67

            No. of No. of

A,i, Lots.
Ensign Whitman 15 68
Widdow Woren 5 69
Thomas Drake 6 70
Giles Leach 4 71
Thomas Bayley 11 72
John Pratt 5 73
Nicholas Byrato 10 74
James Smith, Star. 15 75
Jonas Humphrey 7 76
John Reynolds . 5 77

End of the fir5t Division.

The lotto in the 2d Division beginning on Brauntry lyne.

              No, of N., ld A~,m Llua.

Mr. 'I'llachel 52~ 1
Widdow, Oatis 15 2
John Taylor 18 3
Widdow Read 30 4
Samuel Butterworth 18 5
William Fry's children 18 6
John Vining is 7
Robert Randall 21 8
Elder Bate 51 9
I n Pratt 15 10
11 '. rd Kingman 15 11
John Bicknell , . 30 12
Ensigne Whitman 45 13
John Reynolds 15 14
Phillip Reed 18 15
]Ohn Guppie 21 16
John Show 12 17
Ephraim Hunt 30 18
Edmund Hart 21 19
Thomas Pratt 21 20
Richard Newbury 15 21
John Whitmarsh 27 22
Thomas Whitman 15 23
Deacon Phillips 39 24
Widdow Briggs 18 25
John King, planter 24 26
Nicholas Whitmarsh 15 27
Walter Cooke 15 28
James Smith, Jr. 15 29
James Lovill & his mother 24 30
Widdow Snooke 12 31
Widdow Warrens 15 32
Thomas Drake . 18 33
jonas Humphrey 20 34
John Harding 30 35
Jam" Luddon 24 36
job. Staple 18 37
John Rogers 42 38
William Pytty 36 39
Thomas Streame 24 40

End of the 2d Division.

              N.~ of N.. of

              Acres. Lots.

John Burrell 15 41
Nicholas Byram 30 42
Edward Poole 18 43
Mathew Pratt 12 44
John Ki , seaman 21 45
Thomasn6cmm 18 46
Jacob French 12 47
John Comer 12 48
Richard Bolter 18 49
Henry Kingman 42 50
Hugh Rue 24 51
Macuth Pratt 30 52
William Chard 18 53
John Lovill 21 54
John Thompson is 55
Stephen Fneutb 36 56
William Richards 15 57
Thomas Dyer 33 58
Richard Porter 30 59
William Holbrook 27 60
John Blake 24 61
Thomas Bayley 33 62
Sarah Hunt 18 63
Mr. Gilliam 24 64
Andrew Ford 18 65
G F 21 66
12 67
Wid ow Staple
Giles Leach 12 68
~mes Smith, sea, 45 69
illiam Torrey 70
hn Berge 21 71
muel Parker 12 72
Thomas White 42 73
John Osborne 12 74
Thomas Holbrook 30 75
James Nash 45 76
James Priest 15 77
Richard Phillips 16 78
John Whitman 16 79
202 G.KNFRAL HISTORY

              GREAT SKkKE LINE.

I'hQ original la~ ing out of the "Great Shares," so called, was in theyear 1663. The land was laid out in a base line called the "(;rest Share Line," extending froin the old Braintree and Weyinouth line to the Hingham and Weymouth line, comprising twenty-five hundred acres, and was divided among all tire families in town in proportion as they paid taxes.

The old town of Braintree at the time this line was laid out included the towns of I lolbrook, Randolph, Avon, and Quincy.

There was no woodland in any other part of Weymouth, and that accounted for so inany people in the north part of the town owning woodland in South Weymouth.

These lots were laid off six rods in width on said base il.~_ ~NIendinNo the Abington line and parallel to the Weymouth and Braintree line. c pat ading from Main Street into the "old city," so called, was the division line or right of way to all the woodland on that side.

All land lying north of this line was called the First Division and all land south the Second Division.

The "old city" path was years ago the inain road from South Weymouth to East Abington, which is now Rockland, before Union Street was laid out.

The path that is a continuation of White Street was the one most used. It went into the middle of the swamp to a little Island, which is a little lot of upland, and all of the old deeds speak of it as the" Landing Place so called." Theowners would cut the wood in the fall and cart it out when the awarop was frozen to the "Landing Place," then get it home when they had time ii, the virnmer.

In an old plan of the old swamp which bordered on the Hingham and Weymouth line, drawn by Samuel Thaxter of Hingham, surveyor in 1712, the line between the First and Second Divisions is called the " Middle line."

An old plan drawn by my Great-Grandfather Eliphalet Loud, March 27, 1826, with the stone posts which my father had set in the different lines, is sufficient to locate the whole twenty-five hundred acres. - Lucy H. REED.